lamsbread

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  1. How to make Budder (QWISO) quick wash iso hash This artical was copied and pasted from grasscity "Hashmouf's Official Guides to Homemade Hash" {Step by Step Pictorials}Hello and welcome to Hashmouf's Official Guide To Making Quality "QWISO HASH" There are many different techniques used to make hash, today will we be making "QWISO HASH" often called "QWISO" for short. "QWISO" means = Quick Wash ISO, The Quick wash referring to the short amount of time that the trimmings will be in contact with the ISO better known as Isopropyl Alcohol, which is the solvent used to extract the Trichomes to make hash. As simple a technique this may be there are 3 golden rules to remember for optimal quality. 1. Quality trimmings or buds : The higher quality of trimmings equals the higher quality of hash 2. Proper equipment : The right tools make the extraction easier and preserve purity of the hash 3. Time and patience : By rushing the process you will lose quality and have a low grade hash OK so now that we have gone over the basics for making Quality QWISO lets go over the equipment list. 1. Well dried quality trimmings or buds. for this demonstration I will be using a quarter OZ. of some premium trimmings from my last harvest of Purple Princess. 2. Isopropyl Alcohol, I like to use 91% to prevent etraction of unwanted chlorophyll. 3. A large jar, I used an old pickle jar that was well cleaned. 4. Strainers, 1 large strainer will do but I prefer at least 2 for easier handling. For this I will use 3 for optimal purity. 5. 2 Coffee filters, I use 2 coffee filters doubled up to increase the purity of the extraction Here are some pics of the strainer filter assembly 6. A plate for pouring and evaporating your ISO extraction. Now we have listed all of our equipment, your work area should look like this. Once you have all of your equipment ready the QWISO making begins. Follow these 10 simple steps precisely and you will have Quality QWISO HASH every time. Step 1. Place Dried trimmings or buds in freezer for 30 minutes. Step 2. After your trimmings have been in the freezer for 30 minutes, Carefully transfer them into your jar. Step 3. Pour the Isopropyl Alcohol over the trimmings until completely covered. Step 4. allow to soak for 30 seconds, no more no less. Step 5. Shake as hard as you can for 30 seconds, no more no less. Step 6. Pour into strainer filter over evaporation plate and allow to fully drain Step 7. After you filter the extraction on to the evaporation plate, Carefully move to a safe place and position in front of a small fan allow to evaporate and dry by air for 24 hours minimum [NEVER USE HEAT FOR EVAPORATION !!!! this will lower the quality of your QWISO] Step 8. When the alcohol has evaporated and the extraction has fully dried for a minimum of 24 hours you are ready to harvest your QWISO HASH. Step 9. Once the QWISO is ready for harvest, Carefully use a razor blade to scrape the plate. Step 10. Top off a bowl or a blunt with some high quality QWISO HASH and enjoy !!!!!! SECOND WASH : If you have a high grade trimming with high trichome concentration a second wash is recommended. Even though the quality will be lower then the first wash the second wash will still produce a handsome reward. For a second wash place your trimmings back into the jar, cover with isopropyl alcohol and soak for 30 seconds then shake for 30 seconds. Repeat filtering process and let evaporate and dry for 24 hours minimum. After the evaporation and drying is complete harvest your second batch of QWISO. Here are some pis of my second wash of the same trimmings. Finally, a quality comparison from 3 different washes of the same herb. The first wash is on the left, the second in the middle, the third on the right. Thank you for vising Hashmouf's Official Guide to making Quality "QWISO HASH" Now go make some and get loaded !!!!!!!!
  2. Defoliation - A New Supercropping technique I originally found this technique in a pdf on a torrent site. The method involves plucking fan leave, thus simulating new growth and letting the light in to that new growth. By doing this more bud sites are created. This is first done when the plant is 6"/15cm tall. The process is reapeated throught the veg and bloom stage. Many people will have read that fan leaves should never be removed and will tell you this is so. Times move and things change and new techniques are developed, many growers will tell you that thier method works for them so why change it . I won't try and change anyone or the way they grow but if you like trying new things then this might be for you. I love finding out about new lighting tecnologies and growing methods etc so when i saw this i got quite excited. I am also happy to experiment,In some cases experimentation might not work but so far i have not had any bad luck like that. I have a grow going using this technique and have taken pictures. I will try to post it soon but work has been hectic (i'm self employed). Anyway i'm in it for the duration of my grow, which has been fimmed and defoliated several times so far. Believe/don't believe choice is yours but I will be pleased to have all follow this grow. I leave you with some links from ICMAG First is a grow from "K33ftr33z" follow the entire grow you'll be amazed. Second link is to the defoliation PDF which is a condensed version of the thread, this hilights the main techniques of this growing method. Third link is from "vprising 909" who has also tried this technique. Defoliation - hi yield technique - https://www.icmag.com/ic/showthread.php?t=174163 Download the "hi yield technique" PDF here - https://www.icmag.com/ic/showpost.php?p=3885667&postcount=1381 Defoliation - the field test - by "vprising" - https://www.icmag.com/ic/showthread.php?t=176351&highlight=k33f I hope you find these interesting.To get the best understanding read it fully, skimming will only give you half the story. Peace hunters Lams
  3. Preparing cannabis seeds for easier germination If you look at the edges of a cannabis seed, you'll notice that there's a seam all the way around, and that it's more pronounced on one side - like a ridge. This ridge comes off quite easily and then allows the cannabis seeds to pop right out of their shells with ease. Scarification Grip the cannabis seed between your thumb and forefinger with the ridge side up, then using the sharp edge of a small pocket-knife or paring knife, very gently scrape at a 90 degree angle across the ridge and you'll see it come right off, exposing a slight opening along the edge of the cannabis seed. Take extra care not to squeeze the cannabis seed at all, but spin it around to finish scraping the other end of the ridge [on the same side] Cannabis seeds can take anywhere between 12 hours and 3 weeks to germinate. Most cannabis seeds that do not germinate under good germination/grow conditions are considered non-viable seeds. The 4 main reasons why a cannabis seed is not viable is as follows. [This method is not recommended for first time growers] [1]The cannabis seed has been damaged. [2]The cannabis seed is immature. [3]The cannabis seed is too old. [4]The cannabis seed can not absorb water. Sometimes 3 and 4 go hand in hand. If a cannabis seed does not pop, then most people chuck the cannabis seed. Here is method to help you germinate seeds that may still be viable but are having trouble germinating. The process is called Scuffing. Dig up your cannabis seeds that have not germinated [wait at least 3 weeks]. Get a small box [match box is good] Put sand paper into the box. Put cannabis seeds into the box. Shake around for 30 seconds to 1 minute. The sand paper will wear down the seed coat, making it easier for the seed coat to absorb water and split open. Seed Prep - Then put the cannabis seed into a small container of room temperature filtered/distilled water without any additives for about 18 to 24 hours. Next gently transfer your pre-soaked cannabis seeds to a pair of wet paper towels [pre-warmed to room temperature], maybe in a large tupperware-like covered container. Misting the paper towels daily so it stays nice and damp [but without any standing water puddles in the folds of the towels]. Don't let the towels get too cold, because the wet paper towels will always get chilly fast, so they must be kept in a constantly warm area [but dark]. A heating pad may be required to maintain 78°F to 80°F | 25.5°C to 26.5°C throughout germination. We use a regular heating pad set on low, covered with a light towel to buffer the heat, and on a timer, set to go on and off every half-hour. Make sure they are kept in a very temperature stable area. We use a digital temp gauge, the kind that is not expensive and have a probe on the end of a wire, so you can place the probe right into the wet paper towels. [note: place seeds on top of the fridge if you don’t have a rootmat] Sprouting - Cannabis seeds should sprout within a few days; when they do, they must be transferred to the medium with great care when the taproot has come out about 0.25 inch to 0.5 inch | 6 mm to 12.5 mm. We find that a 0.5 inch | 12.5 mm tap root seems to be the best. When it's much shorter, they tend to get shocked and die easier, and if it's much longer, there's more risk of damage. They are very delicate at this stage; sprouted cannabis seeds can be killed by rough handling, damaging the tap root, or if the soil or medium they're put into has not been properly prepared in advance to the right moisture and temp. If you're using a soil mix, We usually add about 25% perlite and 25% vermiculite to 50% pre-sterilized Supersoil. Using a pencil or something to prepare a hole for your seedling, and lower it in with the taproot down first and the cannabis seed end up. Gently pack or fill in the hole fairly loosely around the taproot, covering the top of the seed by about 0.25 | 6 mm , and we water them with an eyedropper or a spray bottle set on mist. Post germination - Now you'll want to place them under fluorescent lighting about 4 inches to 6 inches | 10 cm to 15 cm away and mist them down daily. Continue to ensure they are kept warm enough, because when the wet medium cools off at night down toward 60°F | 15.5°C it can shock and slow them down or possibly even kill them. How to germinate seeds in soil Here is a method of germinating cannabis seeds that does not resort to paper towels or plastic bags, and the risk of rot these methods bring. Place cannabis seeds in a bowl, and fill the bowl with room temperature tap water. Cover the bowl with card or newspaper and place in a cupboard overnight [12 to 15 hours]. Saturate the soil in your prepared pots with water, then create a small circular depression in the center of the pot. Place each cannabis seed in its own pot, in the center of the depression, pointed tip down. Cover the soil over the cannabis seed, so that is no more than 0.125 inch to 0.25 inch | 3 mm to 6 mm deep. Repeat with all cannabis seeds. Leave sown cannabis seeds for six hours in darkness, then switch on your lights and leave them on. The latest time we used this method, we got 100% germination, and seedlings began erupting from the soil within two days. All viable cannabis seeds should germinate. Seed germination in rockwool Get a jar 500ml | 16oz and fill with distilled water. Than add a 2 to 3 drops of superthrive and shake well. Get an aquarium pump and put an air stone in the jar to keep the water aerated. Drop in your cannabis seeds. Check your cannabis seeds every 6 hours for cracking. Viable cannabis seeds will crack within 2 to 3 days at most. Then Pre-soak the rockwool cubes with 1/4 strength Maxicrop solution. Gently place the cracked cannabis seeds 0.125 inch | 3 mm deep into rockwool cubes. Stick a toothpick in next to cannabis seed hole and gently "lever" toward the cannabis seed to ensure it is in full contact with rockwool. Place the cubes in a tray and cover it with humidity dome. Now place the tray under 2 to 4 foot of lights. Remove the dome once the cannabis seeds sprout. Soil germination problems You ever wonder why those seeds don’t germinate? Here are some things that might stop your cannabis seeds from germinating in soil! Too Wet Cannabis seeds need to be damp, not wet for germination. Excess water prevents oxygen getting to the seed. Poorly drained soils may also cause soil fungus diseases. The condition of wet soils may be improved by adding perlite. which will aerate your soil. Too Dry A certain amount of water is essential for germination, so maintaining a constant soil moisture during the germination period is vital, cover containers with glass or glad wrap to prevent you soil drying out. Too Hot High temperatures result in excessive soil desiccation and injury to cannabis seeds and seedlings. Too Cold Cold temperatures can kill seedlings and prevent germination. Cool temperatures can result in slow, un-even germination, and attack by soil diseases. You may want to start your cannabis seeds indoors, before outplanting. Make sure planting dose not done too early, when it is stll cold and there is a frost hazard. Planting Too Deep This will result in delayed emergence. Cannabis seeds may not be able to grow enough to reach the surface on the limited food storage within the cannabis seed. Soil temperature is also lower with depth. Plant your cannabis seed 0.5 inch to 1 inch | 12.5 mm to 25 mm down for best results. Planting cannabis seeds Too Shallow If you plant your cannabis seeds to shallow the cannabis seeds can dry out. Soil Too Firm Making your soil mix to firm can prevent oxygen getting to your cannabis seeds also drainage is also affected. Soil Too Loose Soil which is too loose results in too much air surrounding the cannabis seed, and they will not absorb moisture and will most likely dry out. Soil fungus Cannabis seeds may root or seedlings fall over. Overwatering, poor drainage and lack of aeration will increase the likelihood of this occurring. Plant cannabis seeds in sterilized potting mix, and make sure you containers are clean. Non Viable cannabis seeds If your cannabis seeds have not been stored correctly they can deteriorate. Look for dark brown cannbis seeds. Avoid and light colored or whitish cannabis seeds as they are not mature. Copied & pasted from - http://www.seedfairy.com/germination.html Peace Lams
  4. Guide To Identifying Your Pests permalink Since the inception of agriculture, mankind has been struggling against the constant predatory aspect of nature trying to eat the crop first. Animals and the elements are problems faced by outdoor growers, however everyone is put to battle with bugs at some point or another. Pests are a constant threat to any grower be it farm crops, a vegetable garden, or growing marijuana. Parasitic insects have been evolving for millions of years to infest, devour, and destroy plant matter in order to ensure their own proliferating survival. . . . and they're professionals. This thread will focus on prevention, identification and eradication of blights afflicting marijuana growers today. PREVENTION It has been said over and over that an ounce of prevention is worth a pound of the cure and I cannot reiterate this maxim enough. Prevent outbreak first and foremost then treat if necessary. Basic cleanliness can help on a massive scale to ensure you never walk up to your garden to have a flood of pests greet you. You work hard and spend harder earned money to produce a crop of smoke, don't risk creating a bug buffet by casual laziness. The following are the major rules to follow in basic pest and disease prevention. Always -Use compost that has been processed properly. A medium heated to 140F/60C will kill larvae, eggs and fungus that is residing there. Cutworms eggs are very common in manure and compost, the marijuana plant has no defense against cutworms rampaging through its roots. When properly composted, both mediums reach these temperatures. Check for the seal of a regulating authority certifying the product. Guarantees are nice to see as well. -Do not use mulch. This easy-accessible, moist, shaded medium is a perfect retreat for incoming pests and fungus. The risk isn't worthwhile. -Keep outdoor tools outside, and indoor tools inside. If there are parasites in either garden, there will be hitchhiking mary jane munchers clinging to them. Tools used for regular yard work should always be sterilized if brought indoors. Rubbing alcohol, soap and water, or a quick pass with a handheld torch will accomplish this nicely. Outdoors -Spray regularly with a pesticide targeted at worms and mites. Returning with the regularity necessary to eradicate an infestation is not usually possible. Check the surrounding area for presence of pests and treat preventively. Spraying should commence in early to mid-summer. This is when the larvae of most pests are becoming fully mobile and airborne. Pesticide should be reapplied every few weeks. -Companion planting is useful as it discourages insect populations. Transplanting foliage with similar characteristics to cannabis will spread out incoming populations of insects allowing the predatory nature of the outdoors to take its course. Additionally, transplanted companion plants will likely become infected prior to your plants giving you the opportunity to halt their spread before it touches your bud. Please, use common sense and inspect companions before transplanting them. Companion planting is useless indoors as bugs have nowhere else to go. Indoors -Keep your growroom a closed space in order to control the environment -Forced air circulation is one of your chief weapons against bugs. Powerful ventilation ensures spores and smaller flying insects do not have opportunity to proliferate. Winds created by oscillating fans make it difficult for bugs to hold on or set up nests. -You should regard outdoor shoes as radioactive inside your growroom. They are easily the most disease and pest infested item of clothing you own. -Wash your hands! Hands are dirty, and you will be coming in direct contact with your bud. Don't come back from a hike in the woods and walk into your growroom. Don't play with your dog, check your vegetable garden and walk into the holiest of holies. Wash up! -Sweep always, mop often, keep debris off your medium. Do not provide condo's to incoming insects, a broom is far cheaper than pesticide. -If your air intake comes from outside, install a filter designed for heating and cooling systems. These commercial filters are designed to keep pests and disease outside. Healthy plants will be the best defense you can possibly have. Often marijuana grows quickly enough to outpace pests, especially when healthy. IDENTIFICATION AND TREATMENT No matter the preventative measures you engage in, a pest population will infiltrate your crop eventually. For you growers with larger gardens, keep your eyes on weak plants! Pests infect one plant first, build up numbers and launch an offensive on every nearby edible object. I once was visiting a compatriot's grow underneath a 4 season porch with 24 plants. The plants on the left were doing very well, but the farther to the right the garden went, the more destroyed his crop had become. Some species of boring worm had successfully attacked a sick plant in a corner. When he discovered the infiltration point, the plant was essentially dead where it stood, worms crawling through almost the entirety of its stalks. From that plant, the worms spread quickly enough to destroy 15 of his 24 plants. Most insects lay thousands of eggs during their lifespan of weeks. If ten pests lay 100 eggs and their offspring each lay 100 eggs, your pest population has jumped from 10 to 100,000. This can occur in DAYS. Pay special attention to sickly plants, the evolutionary process dictates vulnerability to preying organisms. Men greater and wiser than I have adamantly stated that using chemicals on plants destined to be inhaled should ALWAYS be used as a last resort. Commercial and chemical pesticide have the creatures they eradicate listed on the label. Remember if you do choose to use chemicals that you will be lighting this stuff on fire and inhaling the smoke. If you have to use a nuke, allow enough time for the radiation to die down capeesh? Use these long before harvest. This article will focus on organic and non-toxic pest control. There are four methods you can employ to combat pests. -Repression: If the means to exterminate your particular bug isn't immediately available, there are usually countermeasures you can take to slow infestations or decrease numbers of current pests. Taking these countermeasures during treatment further increases the effectiveness of the method you choose to utilize. -Predators: The internet has opened up the world to the grower for specific predatory insects that will dine or destroy others voraciously. Most predators identified in this article are so specialized the specific pest is completely defenseless. -Manual removal: Exactly what it sounds like. Picking the things off, crushing eggs, removing branches that have colonies in place. If caught early enough, manual removal can control pests sufficiently they will not fully infest your plants. -Spray: When applying pesticide in a spray, ensure you use a spreader sticker. This is any type emulsifier that aids the pesticide in sticking to the leaves and commercial products are readily available for purchase. When your plant is budding this is especially necessary because the leaves of your plants are developing coatings of resin that will shed what you are spraying. If not purchasing a product, a teaspoon of dish soap per gallon of water will work fine. Jorge Cervantes tells us that any type of spray applied to plants will slow its growth temporarily as it will clog the stomata on the underside of leaves. Spraying water 1-2 days after application of a spray can help to clear stomata and aid the plant in resuming vigorous growth. Lets get to the beasts shall we? The prevention sections will be all but useless to the outdoor gardener, however the treatments will be equally effective. Pests are listed alphabetically and predators are identified by exact species to avoid any confusion. Copied and pasteded from - http://www.420magazine.com/forums/problems-pests-disease-control/156568-guide-identifying-your-pests.html Peace Lams
  5. FIM Your Way to Multiple Colas! by Sirius Fourside FIMing: The act of pinching or cutting a young cannabis plant in such a way as to force it to grow 4 main colas instead of one. FIM is used as a word itself, but is actually an acronym for “F**k, I missed!” So what exactly is FIMing? FIMing is an easy way for growers to dramatically increase their yields while also making the plant more manageable for limited spaces. I know that sounds too good to be true, but it’s definitely the case! The problem with the natural growth pattern of the cannabis plant is that it tends to be shaped like a Christmas tree. This is inefficient, and not very good for indoor growing since the main cola will typically receive much more light than the rest of the plant. When you FIM your marijuana plant, it grows 4 main colas instead of one (this is where the extra yields come from). Next, the grower would typically tie those 4 colas down a bit to help force the plant into having a flat canopy. This allows you to lower your lights and makes it so most of the plant is receiving a higher overall amount of light. Whenever you see a picture of a marijuana plant with multiple large buds that are at a similar height, the grower almost certainly used FIMing or another technique called ‘Topping’ to achieve this. At this point, choosing whether to FIM or not might seem like a no-brainer, and I agree that it’s a technique that most growers should employ. However, nothing is absolute, and there could be a few scenarios where FIMing isn’t for you: If you’re doing a tiny microgrow, such as in a computer caseIn tiny stealth microgrows, there isn’t always room for an effective FIM.If you’re doing '12/12 from seed'Your plant will get close to skipping the vegetative stage, and that’s the only time to FIM.Auto-flowering strainsIt's generally a bad idea to top OR FIM auto-flowering marijuana plants, as they don't have enough time to recover before they start flowering, similar to plants grown 12/12 from seedYou don’t like having lots of weed at your disposalI know that sounds like a joke (it was, a bit), but some places have limits to the amount of weed you can possess, and FIMing could actually get you in more trouble in some cases because of all the extra buds you will produce.FIMing vs. Topping First, what is ‘Topping’? Topping is a technique similar to FIMing, wherein you cut a young cannabis plant to create extra colas. However, unlike FIMing, the Topping technique produces 2 colas instead of 4. This article is about FIMing, and does not go in depth about Topping. FIMing can be a superior choice in many cases. Why FIM instead of Top? FIMing is less traumatic to the plantWhen you FIM your cannabis, you only need to pinch the newest growth, which doesn't really stress your plant much. With Topping, totally removing the newest growth is necessary, which is a stressful event for young marijuana plants. FIMing barely slows down plant growth; Topping slows down plant growth considerably for a short period. When you FIM your plant, you will see recovery move at a much higher speed than with Topping. When I FIM one of my plants at the beginning of the day, I can usually already see it adjusting by bedtime. FIMing creates 4 main colas at once, while Topping only creates 2.Double the main colas…no explanation needed!It’s easy to FIM a plant more than once! I wouldn’t necessarily advise this tactic for growers who are new to FIMing, but definitely keep this in mind! You can FIM your cannabis plant more than once, and with some Low Stress Training, you get plants with dozens of colas like the one to the right. How to FIM Your Marijuana PlantsThere are three important factors we need to pay attention to when FIMing your plants for the first time: Pinch vs. Cut – What method do we use to remove/damage the new growth and force new colas? Amount – How much do I pinch/cut? Timing – At what point in the plants development do we FIM?Pinch vs. Cut When you’re FIMing your plant, you have the option of either cutting off a piece of the new growth or pinching it. Both have the potential to work equally well at forcing the plant to create new colas. However, I strongly recommend pinching your plant instead of cutting it since pinching leaves more room for error. Another benefit of pinching is that it leaves the damaged foliage on the plant. This way, your girls at least have a chance to continue using those leaves if they can, whereas with cutting they don’t have the option. Here’s a case: In my last grow, I saw a few weird looking leaves that appeared to be chewed-up. Upon further examination, and judging by where I found them, I determined that they were actually pinched leaves! The plant kept those leaves, and used them to make energy all the way til harvest! Amount When FIMing your plants, the amount you’ll want to pinch is actually quite small. You’re basically pinching the tips of the leaves of the newest growth on the main cola that hasn’t ‘stretched-out’ yet. See the picture further down for a good example. Timing The first pinch or cut in a FIM should happen when your plant has 3-5 nodes (or sets of leaves) in total. Once that initial FIM has been completed and the plant has recovered, a grower can use his/her discretion to determine when to FIM again as it’s mostly based on plant health and desired shape. Just remember to make sure your plant looks healthy and recovered before FIMing again! copied and pasted from - http://www.growweedeasy.com/fim-your-way-to-multiple-colas Topping a Plant 1. Locate the very top of your plant and cut through the main stem just below the newest growth. This should be done after the 3rd or 4th leaf set but can be done at any time after the 3rd leaf set. 2. Shows Plant Top cut off and where the 2 new Branches that will form a "Y" in the main stem will grow from. 3. Shows the newly topped plant after 2 days of growth, notice the Y in the Stem Forming. copied and pasted form - http://www.cannaversity.com/cannaversity/article.php?id=091 Fimming After seeing and hearing many questions about the FIM method I decided to do a tutorial on this method to show exactly how it is done and the results that can be achieved. FIM stands for Fuck I Missed and im not sure how it got that name because its very simple to do. I use this method all the time to help create a wide canopy with many branches and colas. Some people FIM each plant more than once to create even more colas and branches and it works very well for them and has very minimal stress on the plant. I usually FIM plants when they are about 10-12 inches tall (I have done it on both taller and shorter plants) but the earlier the better. As long as the plant has at least 4 true sets of leaves it can be FIMmed successfully. All FIMming should be done at least 2 weeks before turning to 12/12 to maximise the growth potential of the new shoots and maximise the benefits of using this method. #1 Locate the very top of the new growth. #2 With a clean, sterilized scissors, Fold the fan leafs over and cut approximately 80% of the new growth off the plant. #3 This is what it should look like after the cut has been made. #4 View of the Cut section after 2 days growth, showing the 4 new growth shoots (branches) I sometimes dont even use scissors and I just pinch out some of the new growth with my fingers. Heres a few pics of another plant that I pinched with my fingers. This plant has been neglected throughout its short life so far and it has been sitting under a shitty fluro light so it would be doing much better under some decent lighting and better conditions but it gives you an idea of the early progress. You can see the dot where the FIM was done. 4/6/09 Now you can see how many new shoots have started to form and you can get some idea of how many main branches this plant will have This is the difference between FIMming and Topping: copied and pasted from -http://www.marijuanagrowing.eu/tutorials-tips-tricks/the-fimming-tutorial-t36632.html Peace Lams
  6. the 3LB’s Molasses Manual - a growers guide to soil sweeteners Originally posted on Cannabis World.[[Recreation of 3LB's (three_little_birds) the 3LB’s Molasses Manual - a growers guide to soil sweeteners]] This is the second in our series of threads on organic gardening techniques and tools started with the Guano Guide / Manure Manual. That particular guide was designed to be a fairly comprehensive look at the uses of poop in gardening. While we tried to keep that topic (and our puns) tasteful - there’s no avoiding the fact it’s not exactly an appetizing subject (unless you happen to be a plant!) Like manure, this subject is another one of those “magical” organic goodies that contributes to plant health in more than one way. It’s also like manure in that it’s a waste or by-product, but when we think about it, this topic really is the “other end of the stick”! Now it’s time to move on to a much much sweeter topic . . . Molasses . . . like the boy’s on South Park are sometimes known for saying - “That’s what I call a sticky situation!” . . . Sweet Organic Goodness - Magical Molasses There are a number of different nutrient and fertilizer companies selling a variety of additives billed as carbohydrate booster products for plants. Usually retailing for tens of dollars per gallon if not tens of dollars per liter, these products usually claim to work as a carbohydrate source for plants. A variety of benefits are supposed to be unlocked by the use of these products, including the relief of plant stresses and increases in the rate of nutrient uptake. On the surface it sounds real good, and while these kinds of products almost always base their claims in enough science to sound good, reality doesn’t always live up to the hype. The 3LB are pretty well known for our distrust of nutrient companies like Advanced Nutrients who produce large lines of products (usually with large accompanying price tags) claiming to be a series of “magic bullets” - unlocking the keys to growing success for new and experienced growers alike. One member of the three_little_birds grower’s and breeder’s collective decided to sample one of these products a while back, intending to give the product a fair trial and then report on the results to the community at Cannabis World. Imagine, if you will, Tweetie bird flying off to the local hydroponics store, purchasing a bottle of the wonder product - “Super Plant Carb!” (not it’s real name) - and then dragging it back to the bird’s nest. With a sense of expectation our lil’ bird opens the lid, hoping to take a peek and a whiff of this new (and expensive) goodie for our wonderful plants. She is greeted with a familiar sweet smell that it takes a moment to place. Then the realization hits her. . . Molasses! The “Super Plant Carb!” smells just like Blackstrap Molasses. At the thought that she’s just paid something like $15 for a liter of molasses, our Tweetie bird scowls. Surely she tells herself there must be more to this product than just molasses. So she dips a wing into the sweet juice ever so slightly, and brings it up to have a taste. Much the same way a sneaky Sylvester cat is exposed by a little yellow bird saying - “I thought I saw a puddy tat . . . I did I did see a puddy tat . . . and he’s standing right there!” - our Tweetie bird had discovered the essence of this product. It was indeed nothing more than Blackstrap Molasses, a quick taste had conformed for our Tweetie bird that she had wasted her time and effort lugging home a very expensive bottle of plant food additive. Molasses is something we already use for gardening at the Bird’s Nest. In fact sweeteners like molasses have long been a part of the arsenal of common products used by organic gardeners to bring greater health to their soils and plants. So please listen to the little yellow bird when she chirps, because our Tweetie bird knows her stuff. The fertilizer companies are like the bumbling Sylvester in many ways, but rather than picturing themselves stuffed with a little bird, they see themselves growing fat with huge profits from the wallets of unsuspecting consumers. Let us assure you it’s not the vision of yellow feathers floating in front of their stuffed mouths that led these executives in their attempt to “pounce” on the plant growing public. And the repackaging of molasses as plant food or plant additive is not just limited to the companies selling their products in hydroponic stores. Folks shopping at places like Wal-Mart are just as likely to be taken in by this tactic. In this particular case the offending party is Schultz® Garden Safe All Purpose Liquid Plant Food 3-1-5. This is a relatively inexpensive product that seems appealing to a variety of organic gardeners. Here’s Shultz own description of their product. “Garden Safe Liquid Plant Foods are made from plants in a patented technology that provides plants with essential nutrients for beautiful flowers and foliage and no offensive smell. Plus they improve soils by enhancing natural microbial activity. Great for all vegetables, herbs, flowers, trees, shrubs and houseplants including roses, tomatoes, fruits, and lawns. Derived from completely natural ingredients, Garden Safe All Purpose Liquid Plant Food feeds plants and invigorates soil microbial activity. Made from sugar beet roots! No offensive manure or fish odors.” That sure sounds good, and the three_little_birds will even go as far as to say we agree 100% with all the claims made in that little blurb of ad copy. But here’s the problem, Shultz isn’t exactly telling the public that the bottle of “fertilizer” they are buying is nothing more than a waste product derived from the production of sugar. In fact, Schultz® Garden Safe 3-1-5 Liquid Plant Food is really and truly nothing more than a form molasses derived from sugar beet processing that is usually used as an animal feed sweetener. If you don’t believe a band of birds, go ahead and look for yourself at the fine print on a Garden Safe bottle where it says - “Contains 3.0% Water Soluble Nitrogen, 1.0% Available Phosphate, 5.0% Soluble Potash - derived from molasses.” The only problem we see, is that animal feed additives shouldn’t be retailing for $7.95 a quart, and that’s the price Shultz is charging for it’s Garden Safe product. While we don’t find that quite as offensive as Advanced Nutrients selling their “CarboLoad” product for $14.00 a liter, we still know that it’s terribly overpriced for sugar processing wastes. So, just as our band of birds gave the scoop on poop in our Guano Guide, we’re now about to give folks the sweet truth about molasses. Molasses is a syrupy, thick juice created by the processing of either sugar beets or the sugar cane plant. Depending on the definition used, Sweet Sorghum also qualifies as a molasses, although technically it’s a thickened syrup more akin to Maple Syrup than to molasses. The grade and type of molasses depends on the maturity of the sugar cane or beet and the method of extraction. The different molasses’ have names like: first molasses, second molasses, unsulphured molasses, sulphured molasses, and blackstrap molasses. For gardeners the sweet syrup can work as a carbohydrate source to feed and stimulate microorganisms. And, because molasses (average NPK 1-0-5) contains potash, sulfur, and many trace minerals, it can serve as a nutritious soil amendment. Molasses is also an excellent chelating agent. Several grades and types of molasses are produced by sugar cane processing. First the plants are harvested and stripped of their leaves, and then the sugar cane is usually crushed or mashed to extract it’s sugary juice. Sugar manufacturing begins by boiling cane juice until it reaches the proper consistency, it is then processed to extract sugar. This first boiling and processing produces what is called first molasses, this has the highest sugar content of the molasses because relatively little sugar has been extracted from the juice. Green (unripe) sugar cane that has been treated with sulphur fumes during sugar extraction produces sulphured molasses. The juice of sun-ripened cane which has been clarified and concentrated produces unsulphured molasses. Another boiling and sugar extraction produces second molasses which has a slight bitter tinge to its taste. Further rounds of processing and boiling yield dark colored blackstrap molasses, which is the most nutritionally valuable of the various types of molasses. It is commonly used as a sweetner in the manufacture of cattle and other animal feeds, and is even sold as a human health supplement. Any kind of molasses will work to provide benefit for soil and growing plants, but blackstrap molasses is the best choice because it contains the greatest concentration of sulfur, iron and micronutrients from the original cane material. Dry molasses is something different still. It’s not exactly just dried molasses either, it’s molasses sprayed on grain residue which acts as a “carrier”. Molasses production is a bit different when it comes to the sugar beet. You might say “bird’s know beets” because one of our flock grew up near Canada’s “sugar beet capitol” in Alberta. Their family worked side by side with migrant workers tending the beet fields. The work consisted of weeding and thinning by hand, culling the thinner and weaker plants to leave behind the best beets. After the growing season and several hard frosts - which increase the sugar content - the beets are harvested by machines, piled on trucks and delivered to their destination. At harvest time, a huge pile of beets will begin to build up outside of the sugar factory that will eventually dwarf the factory itself in size. Gradually throughout the winter the pile will diminish as the whole beets are ground into a mash and then cooked. The cooking serves to reduce and clarify the beet mash, releasing huge columns of stinky (but harmless) beet steam into the air. Sometimes, if the air is cold enough, the steam will fall to the ground around the factory as snow! As we’ve already learned, in the of sugar cane the consecutive rounds of sugar manufacturing produce first molasses and second molasses. With the humble sugar beet, the intermediate syrups get names like high green and low green, it’s only the syrup left after the final stage of sugar extraction that is called molasses. After final processing, the leftover sugar beet mash is dried then combined with the thick black colored molasses to serve as fodder for cattle. Sugar beet molasses is also used to sweeten feed for horses, sheep, chickens, etc. Sugar beet molasses is only considered useful as an animal feed additive because it has fairly high concentrations of many salts including calcium, potassium, oxalate, and chloride. Despite the fact that it’s not suitable for human consumption and some consider it to be an industrial waste or industrial by-product, molasses produced from sugar beets makes a wonderful plant fertilizer. While humans may reject beet molasses due to the various “extras” the sugar beet brings to the table, to our plant’s it’s a different story. Sugar beet molasses is usually fairly chemical free as well, at least in our experience. Although farmers generally fertilize their fields in the spring using the various arrays of available fertilizers, weed chemicals (herbicides) are not used for this crop due to the beet plant’s relatively delicate nature. There is at least one other type of “molasses” we are aware of, and that would be sorghum molasses. It’s made from a plant known as sweet sorghum or sorghum cane in treatments somewhat similar to sugar beets and/or sugar cane processing. If our understanding is correct, sorghum molasses is more correctly called a thickened syrup rather than a by-product of sugar production. So in our eyes sorghum molasses is probably more like Maple Syrup than a true molasses. In the distant past sorghum syrup was a common locally produced sweetener in many areas, but today it is fairly rare speciality product that could get fairly pricey compared to Molasses. Because sorghum molasses is the final product of sweet sorghum processing, and blackstrap and sugar beet molasses are simply waste by-products of sugar manufacturing, it’s pretty easy to understand the difference in expense between the products. The word from the birds is - there isn’t any apparent advantage to justify the extra expense of using sorghum molasses as a substitute for blackstrap or sugar beet molasses in the garden. So if you find sorghum molasses, instead of using it in your garden, you’ll probably want to use it as an alternate sweetener on some biscuits. That’s a quick bird’s eye look at the differences between the various types and grades of molasses and how they are produced. Now it’s time to get a peek at the why’s and how’s of using molasses in gardening. Why Molasses? The reason nutrient manufacturer’s have “discovered” molasses is the simple fact that it’s a great source of carbohydrates to stimulate the growth of beneficial microorganisms. “Carbohydrate” is really just a fancy word for sugar, and molasses is the best sugar for horticultural use. Folks who have read some of our prior essays know that we are big fans of promoting and nourishing soil life, and that we attribute a good portion of our growing success to the attention we pay to building a thriving “micro-herd” to work in concert with plant roots to digest and assimilate nutrients. We really do buy into the old organic gardening adage - “Feed the soil not the plant.” Molasses is a good, quick source of energy for the various forms of microbes and soil life in a compost pile or good living soil. As we said earlier, molasses is a carbon source that feeds the beneficial microbes that create greater natural soil fertility. But, if giving a sugar boost was the only goal, there would be lot’s of alternatives. We could even go with the old Milly Blunt story of using Coke on plants as a child, after all Coke would be a great source of sugar to feed microbes and it also contains phosphoric acid to provide phosphorus for strengthening roots and encouraging blooming. In our eyes though, the primary thing that makes molasses the best sugar for agricultural use is it’s trace minerals. In addition to sugars, molasses contains significant amounts of potash, sulfur, and a variety of micronutrients. Because molasses is derived from plants, and because the manufacturing processes that create it remove mostly sugars, the majority of the mineral nutrients that were contained in the original sugar cane or sugar beet are still present in molasses. This is a critical factor because a balanced supply of mineral nutrients is essential for those “beneficial beasties” to survive and thrive. That’s one of the secrets we’ve discovered to really successful organic gardening, the micronutrients found in organic amendments like molasses, kelp, and alfalfa were all derived from other plant sources and are quickly and easily available to our soil and plants. This is especially important for the soil “micro-herd” of critters who depend on tiny amounts of those trace minerals as catalysts to make the enzymes that create biochemical transformations. That last sentence was our fancy way of saying - it’s actually the critters in “live soil” that break down organic fertilizers and “feed” it to our plants. One final benefit molasses can provide to your garden is it’s ability to work as a chelating agent. That’s a scientific way of saying that molasses is one of those “magical” substances that can convert some chemical nutrients into a form that’s easily available for critters and plants. Chelated minerals can be absorbed directly and remain available and stable in the soil. Rather than spend a lot of time and effort explaining the relationships between chelates and micronutrients, we are going to quote one of our favorite sources for explaining soil for scientific laymen. “Micronutrients occur, in cells as well as in soil, as part of large, complex organic molecules in chelated form. The word chelate (pronounced “KEE-late”) comes from the Greek word for “claw,” which indicates how a single nutrient ion is held in the center of the larger molecule. The finely balanced interactions between micronutrients are complex and not fully understood. We do know that balance is crucial; any micronutrient, when present in excessive amounts, will become a poison, and certain poisonous elements, such as chlorine are also essential micronutrients. For this reason natural, organic sources of micronutrients are the best means of supplying them to the soil; they are present in balanced quantities and not liable to be over applied through error or ignorance. When used in naturally chelated form, excess micronutrients will be locked up and prevented from disrupting soil balance.” Excerpted from “The Soul of Soil” by Grace Gershuny and Joe Smillie That’s not advertising hype either, no product being sold there. That’s just the words of a pair of authors who have spent their lives studying, building, and nurturing soils. Molasses’ ability to act as a chelate explains it’s presence in organic stimulant products like Earth Juice Catalyst. Chelates are known for their ability to unlock the potential of fertilizers, and some smart biological farmers we know are using chelating agents (like Humic Acid) to allow them to make dramatic cuts in normal levels of fertilizer application. One way to observe this reaction at work would be to mix up a solution of one part molasses to nine parts water and then soak an object which is coated with iron rust (like a simple nail for instance) in that solution for two weeks. The chelating action of the molasses will remove the mineral elements of the rust and hold them in that “claw shaped” molecule that Grace and Joe just described. As we’ve commented on elsewhere, it’s not always possible to find good information about the fertilizer benefits of some products that aren’t necessarily produced as plant food. But we’ve also found that by taking a careful look at nutritional information provided for products like molasses that can be consumed by humans, we can get a pretty decent look at the nutrition we can expect a plant to get as well. There are many brand’s of molasses available, so please do not look at our use of a particular brand as an endorsement, our choice of Brer Rabbit molasses as an example is simply due to our familiarity with the product, one of our Grandmother’s preferred this brand. Brer Rabbit Blackstrap Molasses Nutritional Information and Nutrition Facts: Serving Size: 1Tbsp. (21g). Servings per Container: About 24. Amount Per Serving: Calories - 60; Percentage Daily Values; Fat - 0g, 0%; Sodium - 65mg. 3%; Potassium - 800 mg. 23%; Total Carbohydrates - 13g, 4%; Sugars - 12g, Protein - 1g, Calcium - 2%; Iron 10%; Magnesium 15%; Not a significant source of calories from fat, sat. fat, cholesterol, fiber, Vitamin A, and Vitamin C. The How’s of Molasses Undoubtedly some folks are to the point where they are ready for our flock to “cut to the chase.” All the background about molasses making and the various kinds of molasses is good, and knowing how molasses works as a fertilizer is great too, but by now many of you may be thinking - isn’t it about time to learn how to actually use this wonder product?! So this section of the “Molasses Manual” is for our birdie buds who are ready, waiting, and wanting to get going with bringing the sticky goodness of molasses into their garden. Molasses is a fairly versatile product, it can serve as a plant food as well as a an additive to improve a fertilizer mix or tea. Dry molasses can be used as an ingredient in a fertilizer mix, and liquid molasses can be used alone or as a component in both sprays and soil drenches. Your personal preferences and growing style will help to decide how to best use this natural sweetener for it’s greatest effect in your garden. We will try and address the use of dry molasses first, although we will openly admit this is an area where we have little actual experience with gardening use. We’ve certainly mixed dry molasses into animal feed before, so we’re not totally unfamiliar with it’s use. Folks may remember from our earlier description of the various kinds of molasses that dry molasse s is actually a ground grain waste “carrier” which has been coated with molasses. This gives dry molasses a semi-granular texture that can be mixed into a feed mix (for animals) or a soil mix (for our favorite herbs). Dry molasses has a consistency that was described by one bird as similar to mouse droppings or rat turds, (folks had to know we’d fit a manure reference in here somehow). The best use we can envision for dry molasses in the herb garden is to include it in some sort of modified “super-soil” recipe, like Vic High originally popularized for the cannabis community. As we admitted, the use of dry molasses in soil mixes isn’t something we have personal experience with, at least not yet. We are planning some experiments to see how a bit of dry molasses will work in a soil mix. We believe that moderate use should help stimulate micro-organisms and also help in chelating micronutrients and holding them available for our herbs. The plan is to begin testing with one cup of dried molasses added per 10 gallons of soil mix and then let our observations guide the efforts from there. Another option for molasses use in the garden is it’s use alone as a fertilizer. The Schultz Garden Safe Liquid Plant Food is a perfect example of the direct application of molasses as a plant food. Garden Safe products are available from a variety of sources, including Wal-Mart. Although we consider them overpriced for a sugar beet by-product, Garden Safe products are fairly cost effective, especially compared to fertilizers obtained from a hydroponics or garden store, and they can serve as a good introduction to molasses for the urban herb gardener. Here are the basic instructions a gardener would find on the side of a bottle of this sugar beet by-product - Mix Garden Safe Liquid All Purpose Plant Food in water. Water plants thoroughly with solution once every 7-14 days in spring and summer, every 14-30 days in fall and winter. Indoors, use 1/2 teaspoon per quart (1 teaspoon per gallon); outdoors, 1 teaspoon per quart (4 teaspoons per gallon). 32 fluid ounces (946ml). Contains 3.0% Water Soluble Nitrogen, 1.0% Available Phosphate, 5.0% Soluble Potash derived from molasses. In our own experience with Garden Safe Liquid fertilizers, we’ve used a pretty close equivalent to the outdoor rate on indoor herbs with some good success. Our best application rate for Garden Safe 3-1-5 ended up being around 1 Tablespoon per gallon ( 1 Tablespoon = 3 teaspoons). Used alone it’s really not a favorite for continuos use, since we don’t see Garden Safe 3-1-5 as a balanced fertilizer. It doesn’t have enough phosphorous to sustain good root growth and flower formation in the long term. It’s best use would probably be in an outdoor soil grow where there are potential pest issues. Animal by-products like blood meal and bone meal are notorious for attracting varmints, so Garden Safe sugar beet molasses fertilizers could provide an excellent “plant based” source of Nitrogen and Potassium for a soil that’s already been heavily amended with a good slow release source of phosphorous, our choice would be soft rock phosphate. Blackstrap molasses could also be used in a similar fashion, as a stand alone liquid fertilizer for the biological farmer who needs to avoid potential varmint problems caused by animal based products. But, we really believe there is a better overall use for molasses in the organic farmer’s arsenal of fertilizers. Our suggestion for the best available use, would be to make use of the various molasses products as a part making organic teas for watering and foliar feeding. Since many of the folks reading this are familiar with our Guano Guide, it will come as no surprise to our audience that molasses is a product we find very useful as an ingredient in Guano and Manure teas. Most bat and seabird guanos are fairly close to being complete fertilizers, with the main exception being that they are usually short in Potassium. Molasses is turns out is a great source of that necessary Potassium. As we learned earlier, molasses also acts as a chelating agent and will help to make micronutrients in the Guano more easily available for our favorite herbs. A good example of a guano tea recipe at the Bird’s Nest is really as simple as the following: 1 Gallon of water 1 TBSP of guano (for a flowering mix we’d use Jamaican or Indonesian Bat Guano - for a more general use fertilizer we would choose Peruvian Seabird Guano.) 1 tsp blackstrap or sugar beet molasses We mix the ingredients directly into the water and allow the tea mix to brew for 24 hours. It’s best to use an aquarium pump to aerate the tea, but an occasional shaking can suffice if necessary and still produce a quality tea. We will give you one hint from hard personal experience, make sure if you use the shake method that you hold the lid on securely, nobody appreciate having a crap milkshake spread over the room. Some folks prefer to use a lady’s nylon or stocking to hold the guano and keep it from making things messy, but we figure the organic matter the manure can contribute to the soil is a good thing. Using this method we feel like we are getting the benefits of a manure tea and a guano top-dressing all together in the same application. If you prefer to use the stocking method, feel free to feed the”tea bag”leftovers to your worm or compost bin, even after a good brewing there’s lots of organic goodness left in that crap! We also use molasses to sweeten and enrich Alfalfa meal teas. Our standard recipe for this use is: 4 gallons of water 1 cup of fine ground alfalfa meal 1 TBSP blackstrap or sugar beet molasses After a 24 hour brew, this 100% plant-based fertilizer is ready for application. Alfalfa is a great organic plant food, with many benefits above and beyond just the N–P-K it can contribute to a soil mix or tea. We do plan to cover Alfalfa and it’s many uses in greater detail soon in yet another thread. We prefer to mix our alfalfa meal directly into the tea, but many gardeners use the stocking”tea bag”method with great effectiveness, both work well, it’s really just a matter of personal preference. The alfalfa tea recipe we described can be used as a soil drench, and also as a foliar feed. And foliar feeding is the final use of molasses we’d like to detail. Foliar feeding, for the unfamiliar, is simply the art of using fine mist sprays as a way to get nutrients directly to the plant through the minute pores a plant”breathes”through. It is by far the quickest and most effective way to correct nutrient deficiencies, and can be an important part of any gardener’s toolbox. Molasses is a great ingredient in foliar feeding recipes because of it’s ability to chelate nutrients and bring them to the “table” in a form that can be directly absorbed and used by the plant. This really improves the effectiveness of foliar feeds when using them as a plant tonic. In fact it improves them enough that we usually can dilute our teas or mix them more “lean” - with less fertilizer - than we might use without the added molasses. Of course it is possible to use molasses as a foliar feed alone, without any added guano or alfalfa. It’s primary use would be to treat plants who are deficient in Potassium, although molasses also provides significant boosts in other essential minerals such as Sulfur, Iron and Magnesium. Organic farming guides suggest application rates of between one pint and one quart per acre depending on the target plant. For growing a fast growing annual plant like cannabis, we’d suggest a recipe of 1 teaspoon molasses per gallon of water. In all honesty, we’d probably suggest a foliar feeding with kelp concentrate as a better solution for an apparent Potassium shortage. Kelp is one of our favorite foliar feeds because it is a complete source of micronutrients in addition to being a great source of Potassium. Kelp has a variety of other characteristics that we love, and we plan that it will be the topic of it’s own detailed thread at a future date. But, for growers that cannot find kelp, or who might have problems with the potential odors a kelp foliar feeding can create, molasses can provide an excellent alternative treatment for Potassium deficient plants at an affordable price. That looks at most of the beneficial uses of Molasses for the modern organic or biological farmer. Just when you think that’s all there could be from our beaks on the topic of molasses, that molasses and it’s sweet sticky goodness surely have been covered in their entirety, the birds chirp in to say, there is one more specialized use for molasses in the garden. Magical molasses can also help in the control of Fire Ants, and perhaps some other garden pests. Molasses For Organic Pest Control One final benefit of molasses is it’s ability to be used in the control of a couple of common pests encountered in gardening. The most commonly known use of molasses is it’s ability to help control Fire Ants, but we’ve also found an internet reference to the ability of molasses to control white cabbage moths in the UK, so molasses could be an effective pest deterrent in more ways that we are aware. As we said before, there are several references we’ve run across refering to the ability of molasses to control Fire Ants. Since we’re not intimately familiar with this particular use of molasses, and rather than simply re-write and re-word another’s work, we thought we’d defer to the experts. So for this section of the current version of the Molasses Manual, we will simply post a reference article we found that covers topic in better detail than we currently can ourselves. Molasses Makes Fire Ants Move Out By Pat Ploegsma, reprinted from Native Plant Society of Texas News Summer 1999 Have you ever started planting in your raised beds and found fire ant highrises? Are you tired of being covered with welts after gardening? Put down that blowtorch and check out these excellent organic and non-toxic solutions. Malcolm Beck1, organic farmer extraordinaire and owner of Garden-Ville Inc., did some experiments that showed that molasses is a good addition to organic fertilizer (more on fertilizer in the next issue). When using molasses in the fertilizer spray for his fruit trees he noticed that the fire ants moved out from under the trees. “I got an opportunity to see if molasses really moved fire ants. In my vineyard, I had a 500 foot row of root stock vines cut back to a stump that needed grafting. The fire ants had made themselves at home along that row. The mounds averaged three feet apart. There was no way a person could work there without being eaten alive! I dissolved 4 tablespoons of molasses in each gallon of water and sprayed along the drip pipe. By the next day the fire ants had moved four feet in each direction. We were able to graft the vines without a single ant bothering us.” This gave him the idea for developing an organic fire ant killer that is 30% orange oil and 70% liquid compost made from manure and molasses. The orange oil softens and dissolves the ant’s exoskeleton, making them susceptible to attack by the microbes in the compost, while the molasses feeds the microbes and also smothers the ants. After the insects are dead, everything becomes energy-rich soil conditioner and will not harm any plant it touches. It can be used on any insect including mosquitoes and their larvae. Break a small hole in the crust in the center of the mound then quickly!!! pour the solution into the hole to flood the mound and then drench the ants on top. Large mounds may need a second application. Available at Garden-Ville Square in Stafford, it has a pleasant lemonade smell. According to Mark Bowen2, local landscaper and Houston habitat gardening expert, fire ants thrive on disturbed land and sunny grassy areas. “Organic matter provides a good habitat for fire ant predators such as beneficial nematodes, fungi, etc. Other conditions favoring fire ant predators include shading the ground with plantings, good soil construction practices and use of plants taller than turfgrasses.” He recommends pouring boiling soapy water over shallow mounds or using AscendTM. “Ascend is a fire ant bait which contains a fungal by-product called avermectin and a corn and soybean-based grit bait to attract fire ants. Ascend works slowly enough to get the queen or queens and it controls ants by sterilizing and/or killing them outright.” Malcolm Beck also did some experiments with Diatomaceous Earth - DE - (skeletal remains of algae which is ground into an abrasive dust) which confirmed that DE also kills fire ants. He mixes 4 oz. of DE into the top of the mound with lethal results. According to Beck, DE only works during dry weather on dry ant mounds. Pet food kept outdoors will stay ant free if placed on top of a tray with several inches of DE 1Beck, Malcolm. The Garden-Ville Method: Lessons in Nature. Third Edition. San Antonio, TX: Garden-Ville, Inc., 1998. 2Bowen, Mark, with Mary Bowen. Habitat Gardening for Houston and Southeast Texas. Houston, TX: River Bend Publishing Company, 1998. As we had also mentioned earlier, while researching the uses of molasses in gardening, we also came across a reference to it’s use in the control of white cabbage moths. Here’s what we found on that particular topic. “I came across this home remedy from the UK for white cabbage moths. Mix a tablespoon of molasses in 1 litre of warm water and let cool.. spray every week or every 2 weeks as required for white cabbage moth..they hate it..and I thinkit would be good soil conditioner as well if any drops on your soil.. It works for me...but gotta do it before white butterfly lays eggs...otherwise you might have to use the 2 finger method and squash grubs for your garden birds.. "nutNhoney" wrote in message news:10eb7o36vst8r1b@corp.supernews.com... > To the kind soul who posted the tip for spraying members of the cabbage > family with a molasses solution, thank you so much. Today, I noticed a > white moth hovering around my brussel sprouts. I quickly made up a > solution of molasses and rushed back to the garden to spray. The moth > did not land! It seemed to be repelled by the molasses. I sprayed the > broccoli too for good measure. I think I will spray again for the next > few days. If it keeps the cabbage caterpillars off, I will be so happy. > Thanks again!” So there you have it, not necessarily straight from our mouths, but simply one more potential use we’ve discovered for molasses, with at least one testimonial for it’s effectiveness. As we said before, the use of molasses as an foliar spray, in addition to it’s potential use as a pest deterrent, would also serve to provide some essential nutrients directly to our plants, and would especially serve as an effective boost of Potassium for plants diagnosed with a deficiency in K. Healthy plants are more resistant to the threat of pests or disease, so molasses really is a multi-purpose organic pest deterrent. Last Bird's Eye Look At Molasses You’ve heard a lot now about the sweet sticky goodness of Molasses in the garden, but have we mentioned yet that some folks even view Molasses as a health food? One of the 3LB’s had a grandmother who would take a swig of molasses twice every day as a part of her health regimen. We don’t add that as a random fact, but mention it because there’s an interesting little story attached . . . Grandma was driving down the road one day, oblivious to her surroundings, when she was struck with the remembrance that her morning molasses had been forgotten. Most folks wouldn’t have had a solution for this problem at hand, but we have to tell you that this is a lady who traveled with a small bottle of molasses in her purse! So Grandma grabbed the brown bottle of molasses from her purse, and proceeded to uncap it and take a gulp as she drove somewhat uncertainly down the road. Chance would have it, that as she performed this somewhat delicate action, she was observed by an officer of the law weaving down the road. Officer LEO observed Grammy directly as she lifted the small brown bottle to her lips. Of course in that day, beer didn’t come in an aluminum can, but instead was distributed in little brow bottles that looked quite similar to the molasses bottle Grandma had just swigged. We don’t need to tell you where the law enforcement officer’s mind went. Putting two and two together to equal an apparent and immediate danger to the community in an act of wanton disregard for the law, Officer LEO flipped his vehicle around in a 180 turn, flipped on his lights, and began to pursue Grandma. This was a lady we never were quite comfortable letting children ride with, but it was also a day and age before there were many laws allowing intervention to remove the license of an elderly person no longer competent to drive. So, we will just say it was a little while before Grandma noticed the red flashing lights in her rear view mirror. After all she’d been busy putting her molasses away in her purse and watching the road ahead of her, not looking back behind. It probably didn’t help that Grandmother’s first instinct was also to believe that the flashing lights behind her were really meant for someone else. It certainly didn’t occur to Grandma that all of her actions worked to confirm in Officer LEO’s mind that he was dealing with an intoxicated old crone with an apparent total disregard for the not only the law, but also other’s safety. And we probably don’t need to tell you that he wasn’t feeling particularly kind or generous when Grammy finally did pull to the road’s shoulder. As the officer finally approached her car, prepared for trouble from some kind of inebriated old crone, Grandmother came hobbling from her own vehicle a bit unsteadily due to her advanced arthritis. Fortunately we can report that the final ending was happy, without too much unnecessary drama. After verbally demanding the officer’s intent, and then producing the offending brown bottle for the officer’s inspection, grammy was supposedly heard to say, “Good lands officer, do you really think a woman of my standing in the community would EVER imbibe an alcoholic beverage while driving? Well I NEVER! . . . And didn’t your mother ever tell you that molasses is good for you?” Well folks, there you have it, the “Molasses Manual” by the three_little_birds. If your Mother’s or Grandmother’s didn’t tell you about the sticky goodness of molasses, you’ve heard all about it now from the three_little_birds. Like our Guano Guide was designed to be a fairly comprehensive look at manures, we hope this look at soil sweeteners gives folks a thorough look at the uses of molasses in their garden. Hopefully now everyone knows the how’s and why’s of the uses of this sweetener for the soil. It looks like the last thing to add is the where’s. If you are of the theory that your local hydro shop owner isn’t rich enough yet, then please by all means go and purchase an expensive carbo load product, but don’t complain that the three_little_birds didn’t warn you that it’s likely little more than Blackstrap Molasses. Hey, spending it there keeps the money recirculating in the economy and is preferable to burying it in a hole in the backyard. However, if you are a grower who wishes to be a little more frugal, there are certainly cheaper alternatives. We’ve been known to recommend the complete group of Earth Juice fertilizers as a convenient and effective line of liquid organic fertilizers for home herb gardeners. We’ve grown using all thier products including: Bloom, Grow, Meta-K, Microblast, and Catalyst (Xatalyst in Canada! ) Many other’s here at CW also report great success and satisfaction with their products. Well, if folks look at the ingredients in Catalyst, one of the first things they will see is molasses. There are some other goodies in there like kelp, oat bran, wheat malt, and yeast, but we’re thinking that molasses is the main magic in EJ Catalyst. Another choice for obtaining your garden’s molasses is Grandma’s source. It’s pretty likely you can find molasses on the shelf of your local grocery store. For folks living in an urban area this may very well be the best and most economical choice for molasses procurement. But if the folk reading this live anywhere near a rural area, then the best and cheapest source of all will be an farm supply or old fashioned animal feed shop. Your plants don’t care if your molasses comes out of a bottle designed for the kitchen cupboard, or a big plastic jug designed for the feedlot, but your pocketbook will feel the difference. Blackstrap molasses for farm animals is the best overall value for your garden, and it is the molasses option we most strongly endorse for your garden. Although we do our best to post accurate and complete information, we also know that our collective intelligence on a topic far outstrips our individual knowledge and experience, and therefore the collective knowledge and experience of the entire community here at CW is greater still. We also know there are always questions we haven’t anticipated. So we welcome your questions, we encourage comments, and we sincerely hope for useful additions. We even welcome criticism, as long as it’s constructive. We’d like to remind folks to be careful out there . . . happy harvests from the 3LB! Peace Lams
  7. Harvesting, Drying & Curing Step by Step The following artical was copied and pasted from Grasscity.comI have been asked a number of times about harvesting and curing. I understand that there are as many ways to cure Marijuana as there are Marijuana strains. It seems that no two growers do it alike. From harvest day to bong. Here is my method: I can't tell you the exact time to chop your plant down. Some research can tell you how long to flower your strain for best results or you can check trichome color. Either way, you will have to do a bit of trial and error to find the very best day to chop the girls down. At day 60 my White Widow shows a mixture of trichome colors. Most of them will be milky or amber, with a small percent of clear ones scattered about. Use a jeweler's loupe/magnifying glass of 20x magnification or more. A small pocket microscope can be bought at RadioShack: I have grown this strain long enough to know that day 60 gives the best flavor and effect. Day 60. My single plant grow: Time to chop it down: Even if you can take the whole plant in one single cut, I would break it up into large sections. This is so it can get lots of air while drying (branches won't be touching). I take one cola/branch at a time. It is very important to take your time and be gentle in every step of harvesting. It's a good idea to always be gentle with your weed at any stage. Manhandling your bud will cause the trichomes to break off (you don't want that). Using a pair of Fiskars® Softouch Micro-Tip Scissors, I take the first of many branches: Noticed I put on rubber gloves? Get a box of them at the drug store. They are a must have item. You will not get that sap off your hands for days no matter what you wash with. Tie some twist ties or line to the end: I like to hang the branch over a bucket or trash-can: Pluck off all the sun leaves and any leaf that is big enough to pull off (without hurting the bud). They can be easily removed by snapping them off while pulling up or you can use scissors: You don't have to get them all. Just get what you can and save the rest for your "Trim-Party". Before: After: As you finish, stack them on a near by table: Dry Time: Try and find a cool, dark, preferably ventilated space such as a closet, basement, or winter attic. I have no such space at my home, so I use the attic all year. It is dark and ventilated but not always cool. Works anyway. Try and hang all the branches so they don't touch anything: A small oscillating fan on low will help things along real nice: Place all the leaf in a few paper bags and place them in the same space as the hanging branches. Leave bag open. TRIM-PARTY! Let them hang for three days (72 hours). After three days they my feel real dry or real damp. It does not matter. Note: You might want to stir the bag of leaves after a day or so. They tend to be real wet. Three days later. So sad the big bud is so small now: Let's get this party started. Lay out all your trim gear. A trim tray (cookie sheet will work), rubber gloves, micro-tip scissors, large paper grocery bags, small brown lunch bags and a few razors (to clean the scissors). Music helps or someone to talk to. It becomes un-fun in 15 minutes (trust me). Most the water has evaporated out of the branches. Before: After: Time to manicure and finish your trimming. This task takes some time and a whole lot of patients. Take a branch and start at the bottom, cutting off all leaves and bud leaf tips. After your get all the big leaves off, pretend you are giving a slight trim to the whole bud. The very tips of the bud leaves will cause the smoke to be harsh, so just do a slight trim all around. Before: After: Now clip the buds off the main stem. Glad that's over: Brown Bag Um: Get a few brown grocery bags and a pack of brown lunch bags. Shred the brown lunch bags (not confetti but strips). I bought a cheap shredder to make strips from the lunch bags: Now lay down a layer of bud at the bottom of the grocery bag (one bud thick): Place a layer of the bag strips over the top of your bud: Place another layer of bud on top of the strips: Keep making layers until the grocery bag is full. Your last layer should be strips: Place your grocery bags in a cool dry place for two days. Churn/mix the bud and strip layers gently and place back for another one or two days: Your bud may look over dry or a little crisp when done. Over dry is much much better then moist. The texture and smell will come back while curing in the jars. Your bud is smoke-able but harsh until cured in jars. The longer it stays in the jar, the smoother the smoke and the stronger the smell. I like the 32oz wide mouth Ball mason jars. They can be found at every grocery store, but next to impossible to locate the isle they are on. Look hard: Don't pack the bud in the jar. Fill them up about 80% to 90%. You can get close to an ounce of small buds in a jar (could be wrong about this fact). Less if they are bigger bud: If the bud it a bit too long, don't squish it or bend it. Just cut it up: After your jars are filled, take a break (you need it): Always store your jars in a cool, dark, and safe location. Light is bad for your weed. Try to remember to open each jar twice a week for the first month. Leave it open for a few minutes and seal it back up. I don't always do this (I forget), but it makes a difference. It's also a good idea to check for mold while opening each one. We can never wait the month that is recommended for jar curing. But it does get much better as time passes. After a month it is killer.
  8. Growing with Molasses Finishing with a bit of mollasses does increase crystal content I want to make it abudantly clear that this is copied and pasted from Overgrow from a user named three_little_birds. This is good stuff and even better to know and implement. Without further ado three_little_birds' complete guide to Molasses. "There are a number of different nutrient and fertilizer companies selling a variety of additives billed as carbohydrate booster products for plants. Usually retailing for tens of dollars per gallon if not tens of dollars per liter, these products usually claim to work as a carbohydrate source for plants. A variety of benefits are supposed to be unlocked by the use of these products, including the relief of plant stresses and increases in the rate of nutrient uptake. On the surface it sounds real good, and while these kinds of products almost always base their claims in enough science to sound good, reality doesn’t always live up to the hype. The 3LB are pretty well known for our distrust of nutrient companies like Advanced Nutrients who produce large lines of products (usually with large accompanying price tags) claiming to be a series of “magic bullets” - unlocking the keys to growing success for new and experienced growers alike. One member of the three_little_birds grower’s and breeder’s collective decided to sample one of these products a while back, intending to give the product a fair trial and then report on the results to the community at Cannabis World. Imagine, if you will, Tweetie bird flying off to the local hydroponics store, purchasing a bottle of the wonder product - “Super Plant Carb!” (not it’s real name) - and then dragging it back to the bird’s nest. With a sense of expectation our lil’ bird opens the lid, hoping to take a peek and a whiff of this new (and expensive) goodie for our wonderful plants. She is greeted with a familiar sweet smell that it takes a moment to place. Then the realization hits her. . . Molasses! The “Super Plant Carb!” smells just like Blackstrap Molasses. At the thought that she’s just paid something like $15 for a liter of molasses, our Tweetie bird scowls. Surely she tells herself there must be more to this product than just molasses. So she dips a wing into the sweet juice ever so slightly, and brings it up to have a taste. Much the same way a sneaky Sylvester cat is exposed by a little yellow bird saying - “I thought I saw a puddy tat . . . I did I did see a puddy tat . . . and he’s standing right there!” - our Tweetie bird had discovered the essence of this product. It was indeed nothing more than Blackstrap Molasses, a quick taste had conformed for our Tweetie bird that she had wasted her time and effort lugging home a very expensive bottle of plant food additive. Molasses is something we already use for gardening at the Bird’s Nest. In fact sweeteners like molasses have long been a part of the arsenal of common products used by organic gardeners to bring greater health to their soils and plants. So please listen to the little yellow bird when she chirps, because our Tweetie bird knows her stuff. The fertilizer companies are like the bumbling Sylvester in many ways, but rather than picturing themselves stuffed with a little bird, they see themselves growing fat with huge profits from the wallets of unsuspecting consumers. Let us assure you it’s not the vision of yellow feathers floating in front of their stuffed mouths that led these executives in their attempt to “pounce” on the plant growing public. And the repackaging of molasses as plant food or plant additive is not just limited to the companies selling their products in hydroponic stores. Folks shopping at places like Wal-Mart are just as likely to be taken in by this tactic. In this particular case the offending party is Schultz® Garden Safe All Purpose Liquid Plant Food 3-1-5. This is a relatively inexpensive product that seems appealing to a variety of organic gardeners. Here’s Shultz own description of their product. “Garden Safe Liquid Plant Foods are made from plants in a patented technology that provides plants with essential nutrients for beautiful flowers and foliage and no offensive smell. Plus they improve soils by enhancing natural microbial activity. Great for all vegetables, herbs, flowers, trees, shrubs and houseplants including roses, tomatoes, fruits, and lawns. Derived from completely natural ingredients, Garden Safe All Purpose Liquid Plant Food feeds plants and invigorates soil microbial activity. Made from sugar beet roots! No offensive manure or fish odors.” That sure sounds good, and the three_little_birds will even go as far as to say we agree 100% with all the claims made in that little blurb of ad copy. But here’s the problem, Shultz isn’t exactly telling the public that the bottle of “fertilizer” they are buying is nothing more than a waste product derived from the production of sugar. In fact, Schultz® Garden Safe 3-1-5 Liquid Plant Food is really and truly nothing more than a form molasses derived from sugar beet processing that is usually used as an animal feed sweetener. If you don’t believe a band of birds, go ahead and look for yourself at the fine print on a Garden Safe bottle where it says - “Contains 3.0% Water Soluble Nitrogen, 1.0% Available Phosphate, 5.0% Soluble Potash - derived from molasses.” The only problem we see, is that animal feed additives shouldn’t be retailing for $7.95 a quart, and that’s the price Shultz is charging for it’s Garden Safe product. While we don’t find that quite as offensive as Advanced Nutrients selling their “CarboLoad” product for $14.00 a liter, we still know that it’s terribly overpriced for sugar processing wastes. So, just as our band of birds gave the scoop on poop in our Guano Guide, we’re now about to give folks the sweet truth about molasses. Is The Story Behind This Sweet Sticky Garden Goodness? Molasses is a syrupy, thick juice created by the processing of either sugar beets or the sugar cane plant. Depending on the definition used, Sweet Sorghum also qualifies as a molasses, although technically it’s a thickened syrup more akin to Maple Syrup than to molasses. The grade and type of molasses depends on the maturity of the sugar cane or beet and the method of extraction. The different molasses’ have names like: first molasses, second molasses, unsulphured molasses, sulphured molasses, and blackstrap molasses. For gardeners the sweet syrup can work as a carbohydrate source to feed and stimulate microorganisms. And, because molasses (average NPK 1-0-5) contains potash, sulfur, and many trace minerals, it can serve as a nutritious soil amendment. Molasses is also an excellent chelating agent. Several grades and types of molasses are produced by sugar cane processing. First the plants are harvested and stripped of their leaves, and then the sugar cane is usually crushed or mashed to extract it’s sugary juice. Sugar manufacturing begins by boiling cane juice until it reaches the proper consistency, it is then processed to extract sugar. This first boiling and processing produces what is called first molasses, this has the highest sugar content of the molasses because relatively little sugar has been extracted from the juice. Green (unripe) sugar cane that has been treated with sulphur fumes during sugar extraction produces sulphured molasses. The juice of sun-ripened cane which has been clarified and concentrated produces unsulphured molasses. Another boiling and sugar extraction produces second molasses which has a slight bitter tinge to its taste. Further rounds of processing and boiling yield dark colored blackstrap molasses, which is the most nutritionally valuable of the various types of molasses. It is commonly used as a sweetner in the manufacture of cattle and other animal feeds, and is even sold as a human health supplement. Any kind of molasses will work to provide benefit for soil and growing plants, but blackstrap molasses is the best choice because it contains the greatest concentration of sulfur, iron and micronutrients from the original cane material. Dry molasses is something different still. It’s not exactly just dried molasses either, it’s molasses sprayed on grain residue which acts as a “carrier”. Molasses production is a bit different when it comes to the sugar beet. You might say “bird’s know beets” because one of our flock grew up near Canada’s “sugar beet capitol” in Alberta. Their family worked side by side with migrant workers tending the beet fields. The work consisted of weeding and thinning by hand, culling the thinner and weaker plants to leave behind the best beets. After the growing season and several hard frosts - which increase the sugar content - the beets are harvested by machines, piled on trucks and delivered to their destination. At harvest time, a huge pile of beets will begin to build up outside of the sugar factory that will eventually dwarf the factory itself in size. Gradually throughout the winter the pile will diminish as the whole beets are ground into a mash and then cooked. The cooking serves to reduce and clarify the beet mash, releasing huge columns of stinky (but harmless) beet steam into the air. Sometimes, if the air is cold enough, the steam will fall to the ground around the factory as snow! As we’ve already learned, in the of sugar cane the consecutive rounds of sugar manufacturing produce first molasses and second molasses. With the humble sugar beet, the intermediate syrups get names like high green and low green, it’s only the syrup left after the final stage of sugar extraction that is called molasses. After final processing, the leftover sugar beet mash is dried then combined with the thick black colored molasses to serve as fodder for cattle. Sugar beet molasses is also used to sweeten feed for horses, sheep, chickens, etc. Sugar beet molasses is only considered useful as an animal feed additive because it has fairly high concentrations of many salts including calcium, potassium, oxalate, and chloride. Despite the fact that it’s not suitable for human consumption and some consider it to be an industrial waste or industrial by-product, molasses produced from sugar beets makes a wonderful plant fertilizer. While humans may reject beet molasses due to the various “extras” the sugar beet brings to the table, to our plant’s it’s a different story. Sugar beet molasses is usually fairly chemical free as well, at least in our experience. Although farmers generally fertilize their fields in the spring using the various arrays of available fertilizers, weed chemicals (herbicides) are not used for this crop due to the beet plant’s relatively delicate nature. There is at least one other type of “molasses” we are aware of, and that would be sorghum molasses. It’s made from a plant known as sweet sorghum or sorghum cane in treatments somewhat similar to sugar beets and/or sugar cane processing. If our understanding is correct, sorghum molasses is more correctly called a thickened syrup rather than a by-product of sugar production. So in our eyes sorghum molasses is probably more like Maple Syrup than a true molasses. In the distant past sorghum syrup was a common locally produced sweetener in many areas, but today it is fairly rare speciality product that could get fairly pricey compared to Molasses. Because sorghum molasses is the final product of sweet sorghum processing, and blackstrap and sugar beet molasses are simply waste by-products of sugar manufacturing, it’s pretty easy to understand the difference in expense between the products. The word from the birds is - there isn’t any apparent advantage to justify the extra expense of using sorghum molasses as a substitute for blackstrap or sugar beet molasses in the garden. So if you find sorghum molasses, instead of using it in your garden, you’ll probably want to use it as an alternate sweetener on some biscuits. That’s a quick bird’s eye look at the differences between the various types and grades of molasses and how they are produced. Now it’s time to get a peek at the why’s and how’s of using molasses in gardening. Why Molasses? The reason nutrient manufacturer’s have “discovered” molasses is the simple fact that it’s a great source of carbohydrates to stimulate the growth of beneficial microorganisms. “Carbohydrate” is really just a fancy word for sugar, and molasses is the best sugar for horticultural use. Folks who have read some of our prior essays know that we are big fans of promoting and nourishing soil life, and that we attribute a good portion of our growing success to the attention we pay to building a thriving “micro-herd” to work in concert with plant roots to digest and assimilate nutrients. We really do buy into the old organic gardening adage - “Feed the soil not the plant.” Molasses is a good, quick source of energy for the various forms of microbes and soil life in a compost pile or good living soil. As we said earlier, molasses is a carbon source that feeds the beneficial microbes that create greater natural soil fertility. But, if giving a sugar boost was the only goal, there would be lot’s of alternatives. We could even go with the old Milly Blunt story of using Coke on plants as a child, after all Coke would be a great source of sugar to feed microbes and it also contains phosphoric acid to provide phosphorus for strengthening roots and encouraging blooming. In our eyes though, the primary thing that makes molasses the best sugar for agricultural use is it’s trace minerals. In addition to sugars, molasses contains significant amounts of potash, sulfur, and a variety of micronutrients. Because molasses is derived from plants, and because the manufacturing processes that create it remove mostly sugars, the majority of the mineral nutrients that were contained in the original sugar cane or sugar beet are still present in molasses. This is a critical factor because a balanced supply of mineral nutrients is essential for those “beneficial beasties” to survive and thrive. That’s one of the secrets we’ve discovered to really successful organic gardening, the micronutrients found in organic amendments like molasses, kelp, and alfalfa were all derived from other plant sources and are quickly and easily available to our soil and plants. This is especially important for the soil “micro-herd” of critters who depend on tiny amounts of those trace minerals as catalysts to make the enzymes that create biochemical transformations. That last sentence was our fancy way of saying - it’s actually the critters in “live soil” that break down organic fertilizers and “feed” it to our plants. One final benefit molasses can provide to your garden is it’s ability to work as a chelating agent. That’s a scientific way of saying that molasses is one of those “magical” substances that can convert some chemical nutrients into a form that’s easily available for critters and plants. Chelated minerals can be absorbed directly and remain available and stable in the soil. Rather than spend a lot of time and effort explaining the relationships between chelates and micronutrients, we are going to quote one of our favorite sources for explaining soil for scientific laymen. “Micronutrients occur, in cells as well as in soil, as part of large, complex organic molecules in chelated form. The word chelate (pronounced “KEE-late”) comes from the Greek word for “claw,” which indicates how a single nutrient ion is held in the center of the larger molecule. The finely balanced interactions between micronutrients are complex and not fully understood. We do know that balance is crucial; any micronutrient, when present in excessive amounts, will become a poison, and certain poisonous elements, such as chlorine are also essential micronutrients. For this reason natural, organic sources of micronutrients are the best means of supplying them to the soil; they are present in balanced quantities and not liable to be over applied through error or ignorance. When used in naturally chelated form, excess micronutrients will be locked up and prevented from disrupting soil balance.” Excerpted from “The Soul of Soil” by Grace Gershuny and Joe Smillie That’s not advertising hype either, no product being sold there. That’s just the words of a pair of authors who have spent their lives studying, building, and nurturing soils. Molasses’ ability to act as a chelate explains it’s presence in organic stimulant products like Earth Juice Catalyst. Chelates are known for their ability to unlock the potential of fertilizers, and some smart biological farmers we know are using chelating agents (like Humic Acid) to allow them to make dramatic cuts in normal levels of fertilizer application. One way to observe this reaction at work would be to mix up a solution of one part molasses to nine parts water and then soak an object which is coated with iron rust (like a simple nail for instance) in that solution for two weeks. The chelating action of the molasses will remove the mineral elements of the rust and hold them in that “claw shaped” molecule that Grace and Joe just described. As we’ve commented on elsewhere, it’s not always possible to find good information about the fertilizer benefits of some products that aren’t necessarily produced as plant food. But we’ve also found that by taking a careful look at nutritional information provided for products like molasses that can be consumed by humans, we can get a pretty decent look at the nutrition we can expect a plant to get as well. There are many brand’s of molasses available, so please do not look at our use of a particular brand as an endorsement, our choice of Brer Rabbit molasses as an example is simply due to our familiarity with the product, one of our Grandmother’s preferred this brand. Brer Rabbit Blackstrap Molasses Nutritional Information and Nutrition Facts: Serving Size: 1Tbsp. (21g). Servings per Container: About 24. Amount Per Serving: Calories - 60; Percentage Daily Values; Fat - 0g, 0%; Sodium - 65mg. 3%; Potassium - 800 mg. 23%; Total Carbohydrates - 13g, 4%; Sugars - 12g, Protein - 1g, Calcium - 2%; Iron 10%; Magnesium 15%; Not a significant source of calories from fat, sat. fat, cholesterol, fiber, Vitamin A, and Vitamin C." How’s of Molasses Undoubtedly some folks are to the point where they are ready for our flock to “cut to the chase.” All the background about molasses making and the various kinds of molasses is good, and knowing how molasses works as a fertilizer is great too, but by now many of you may be thinking - isn’t it about time to learn how to actually use this wonder product?! So this section of the “Molasses Manual” is for our birdie buds who are ready, waiting, and wanting to get going with bringing the sticky goodness of molasses into their garden. Molasses is a fairly versatile product, it can serve as a plant food as well as an additive to improve a fertilizer mix or tea. Dry molasses can be used as an ingredient in a fertilizer mix, and liquid molasses can be used alone or as a component in both sprays and soil drenches. Your personal preferences and growing style will help to decide how to best use this natural sweetener for it’s greatest effect in your garden. We will try and address the use of dry molasses first, although we will openly admit this is an area where we have little actual experience with gardening use. We’ve certainly mixed dry molasses into animal feed before, so we’re not totally unfamiliar with it’s use. Folks may remember from our earlier description of the various kinds of molasses that dry molasses is actually a ground grain waste “carrier” which has been coated with molasses. This gives dry molasses a semi-granular texture that can be mixed into a feed mix (for animals) or a soil mix (for our favorite herbs). Dry molasses has a consistency that was described by one bird as similar to mouse droppings or rat turds, (folks had to know we’d fit a manure reference in here somehow). The best use we can envision for dry molasses in the herb garden is to include it in some sort of modified “super-soil” recipe, like Vic High originally popularized for the cannabis community. As we admitted, the use of dry molasses in soil mixes isn’t something we have personal experience with, at least not yet. We are planning some experiments to see how a bit of dry molasses will work in a soil mix. We believe that moderate use should help stimulate micro-organisms and also help in chelating micronutrients and holding them available for our herbs. The plan is to begin testing with one cup of dried molasses added per 10 gallons of soil mix and then let our observations guide the efforts from there. Another option for molasses use in the garden is it’s use alone as a fertilizer. The Schultz Garden Safe Liquid Plant Food is a perfect example of the direct application of molasses as a plant food. Garden Safe products are available from a variety of sources, including Wal-Mart. Although we consider them overpriced for a sugar beet by-product, Garden Safe products are fairly cost effective, especially compared to fertilizers obtained from a hydroponics or garden store, and they can serve as a good introduction to molasses for the urban herb gardener. Here are the basic instructions a gardener would find on the side of a bottle of this sugar beet by-product - Mix Garden Safe Liquid All Purpose Plant Food in water. Water plants thoroughly with solution once every 7-14 days in spring and summer, every 14-30 days in fall and winter. Indoors, use 1/2 teaspoon per quart (1 teaspoon per gallon); outdoors, 1 teaspoon per quart (4 teaspoons per gallon). 32 fluid ounces (946ml). Contains 3.0% Water Soluble Nitrogen, 1.0% Available Phosphate, 5.0% Soluble Potash derived from molasses. In our own experience with Garden Safe Liquid fertilizers, we’ve used a pretty close equivalent to the outdoor rate on indoor herbs with some good success. Our best application rate for Garden Safe 3-1-5 ended up being around 1 Tablespoon per gallon ( 1 Tablespoon = 3 teaspoons). Used alone it’s really not a favorite for continuos use, since we don’t see Garden Safe 3-1-5 as a balanced fertilizer. It doesn’t have enough phosphorous to sustain good root growth and flower formation in the long term. It’s best use would probably be in an outdoor soil grow where there are potential pest issues. Animal by-products like blood meal and bone meal are notorious for attracting varmints, so Garden Safe sugar beet molasses fertilizers could provide an excellent “plant based” source of Nitrogen and Potassium for a soil that’s already been heavily amended with a good slow release source of phosphorous, our choice would be soft rock phosphate. Blackstrap molasses could also be used in a similar fashion, as a stand alone liquid fertilizer for the biological farmer who needs to avoid potential varmint problems caused by animal based products. But, we really believe there is a better overall use for molasses in the organic farmer’s arsenal of fertilizers. Our suggestion for the best available use, would be to make use of the various molasses products as a part making organic teas for watering and foliar feeding. Since many of the folks reading this are familiar with our Guano Guide, it will come as no surprise to our audience that molasses is a product we find very useful as an ingredient in Guano and Manure teas. Most bat and seabird guanos are fairly close to being complete fertilizers, with the main exception being that they are usually short in Potassium. Molasses is turns out is a great source of that necessary Potassium. As we learned earlier, molasses also acts as a chelating agent and will help to make micronutrients in the Guano more easily available for our favorite herbs. A good example of a guano tea recipe at the Bird’s Nest is really as simple as the following: 1 Gallon of water 1 TBSP of guano (for a flowering mix we’d use Jamaican or Indonesian Bat Guano - for a more general use fertilizer we would choose Peruvian Seabird Guano.) 1 tsp blackstrap or sugar beet molasses We mix the ingredients directly into the water and allow the tea mix to brew for 24 hours. It’s best to use an aquarium pump to aerate the tea, but an occasional shaking can suffice if necessary and still produce a quality tea. We will give you one hint from hard personal experience, make sure if you use the shake method that you hold the lid on securely, nobody appreciate having a crap milkshake spread over the room. Some folks prefer to use a lady’s nylon or stocking to hold the guano and keep it from making things messy, but we figure the organic matter the manure can contribute to the soil is a good thing. Using this method we feel like we are getting the benefits of a manure tea and a guano top-dressing all together in the same application. If you prefer to use the stocking method, feel free to feed the”tea bag”leftovers to your worm or compost bin, even after a good brewing there’s lots of organic goodness left in that crap! We also use molasses to sweeten and enrich Alfalfa meal teas. Our standard recipe for this use is: 4 gallons of water 1 cup of fine ground alfalfa meal 1 TBSP blackstrap or sugar beet molasses After a 24 hour brew, this 100% plant-based fertilizer is ready for application. Alfalfa is a great organic plant food, with many benefits above and beyond just the N–P-K it can contribute to a soil mix or tea. We do plan to cover Alfalfa and it’s many uses in greater detail soon in yet another thread. We prefer to mix our alfalfa meal directly into the tea, but many gardeners use the stocking”tea bag”method with great effectiveness, both work well, it’s really just a matter of personal preference. The alfalfa tea recipe we described can be used as a soil drench, and also as a foliar feed. And foliar feeding is the final use of molasses we’d like to detail. Foliar feeding, for the unfamiliar, is simply the art of using fine mist sprays as a way to get nutrients directly to the plant through the minute pores a plant”breathes”through. It is by far the quickest and most effective way to correct nutrient deficiencies, and can be an important part of any gardener’s toolbox. Molasses is a great ingredient in foliar feeding recipes because of it’s ability to chelate nutrients and bring them to the “table” in a form that can be directly absorbed and used by the plant. This really improves the effectiveness of foliar feeds when using them as a plant tonic. In fact it improves them enough that we usually can dilute our teas or mix them more “lean” - with less fertilizer - than we might use without the added molasses. Of course it is possible to use molasses as a foliar feed alone, without any added guano or alfalfa. It’s primary use would be to treat plants who are deficient in Potassium, although molasses also provides significant boosts in other essential minerals such as Sulfur, Iron and Magnesium. Organic farming guides suggest application rates of between one pint and one quart per acre depending on the target plant. For growing a fast growing annual plant like cannabis, we’d suggest a recipe of 1 teaspoon molasses per gallon of water. In all honesty, we’d probably suggest a foliar feeding with kelp concentrate as a better solution for an apparent Potassium shortage. Kelp is one of our favorite foliar feeds because it is a complete source of micronutrients in addition to being a great source of Potassium. Kelp has a variety of other characteristics that we love, and we plan that it will be the topic of it’s own detailed thread at a future date. But, for growers that cannot find kelp, or who might have problems with the potential odors a kelp foliar feeding can create, molasses can provide an excellent alternative treatment for Potassium deficient plants at an affordable price. That looks at most of the beneficial uses of Molasses for the modern organic or biological farmer. Just when you think that’s all there could be from our beaks on the topic of molasses, that molasses and it’s sweet sticky goodness surely have been covered in their entirety, the birds chirp in to say, there is one more specialized use for molasses in the garden. Magical molasses can also help in the control of Fire Ants, and perhaps some other garden pests. Molasses For Organic Pest Control One final benefit of molasses is it’s ability to be used in the control of a couple of common pests encountered in gardening. The most commonly known use of molasses is it’s ability to help control Fire Ants, but we’ve also found an internet reference to the ability of molasses to control white cabbage moths in the UK, so molasses could be an effective pest deterrent in more ways that we are aware. As we said before, there are several references we’ve run across refering to the ability of molasses to control Fire Ants. Since we’re not intimately familiar with this particular use of molasses, and rather than simply re-write and re-word another’s work, we thought we’d defer to the experts. So for this section of the current version of the Molasses Manual, we will simply post a reference article we found that covers topic in better detail than we currently can ourselves. Molasses Makes Fire Ants Move Out By Pat Ploegsma, reprinted from Native Plant Society of Texas News Summer 1999 Have you ever started planting in your raised beds and found fire ant highrises? Are you tired of being covered with welts after gardening? Put down that blowtorch and check out these excellent organic and non-toxic solutions. Malcolm Beck1, organic farmer extraordinaire and owner of Garden-Ville Inc., did some experiments that showed that molasses is a good addition to organic fertilizer (more on fertilizer in the next issue). When using molasses in the fertilizer spray for his fruit trees he noticed that the fire ants moved out from under the trees. “I got an opportunity to see if molasses really moved fire ants. In my vineyard, I had a 500 foot row of root stock vines cut back to a stump that needed grafting. The fire ants had made themselves at home along that row. The mounds averaged three feet apart. There was no way a person could work there without being eaten alive! I dissolved 4 tablespoons of molasses in each gallon of water and sprayed along the drip pipe. By the next day the fire ants had moved four feet in each direction. We were able to graft the vines without a single ant bothering us.” This gave him the idea for developing an organic fire ant killer that is 30% orange oil and 70% liquid compost made from manure and molasses. The orange oil softens and dissolves the ant’s exoskeleton, making them susceptible to attack by the microbes in the compost, while the molasses feeds the microbes and also smothers the ants. After the insects are dead, everything becomes energy-rich soil conditioner and will not harm any plant it touches. It can be used on any insect including mosquitoes and their larvae. Break a small hole in the crust in the center of the mound then quickly!!! pour the solution into the hole to flood the mound and then drench the ants on top. Large mounds may need a second application. Available at Garden-Ville Square in Stafford, it has a pleasant lemonade smell. According to Mark Bowen2, local landscaper and Houston habitat gardening expert, fire ants thrive on disturbed land and sunny grassy areas. “Organic matter provides a good habitat for fire ant predators such as beneficial nematodes, fungi, etc. Other conditions favoring fire ant predators include shading the ground with plantings, good soil construction practices and use of plants taller than turfgrasses.” He recommends pouring boiling soapy water over shallow mounds or using AscendTM. “Ascend is a fire ant bait which contains a fungal by-product called avermectin and a corn and soybean-based grit bait to attract fire ants. Ascend works slowly enough to get the queen or queens and it controls ants by sterilizing and/or killing them outright.” Malcolm Beck also did some experiments with Diatomaceous Earth - DE - (skeletal remains of algae which is ground into an abrasive dust) which confirmed that DE also kills fire ants. He mixes 4 oz. of DE into the top of the mound with lethal results. According to Beck, DE only works during dry weather on dry ant mounds. Pet food kept outdoors will stay ant free if placed on top of a tray with several inches of DE 1Beck, Malcolm. The Garden-Ville Method: Lessons in Nature. Third Edition. San Antonio, TX: Garden-Ville, Inc., 1998. 2Bowen, Mark, with Mary Bowen. Habitat Gardening for Houston and Southeast Texas. Houston, TX: River Bend Publishing Company, 1998. As we had also mentioned earlier, while researching the uses of molasses in gardening, we also came across a reference to it’s use in the control of white cabbage moths. Here’s what we found on that particular topic. “I came across this home remedy from the UK for white cabbage moths. Mix a tablespoon of molasses in 1 litre of warm water and let cool.. spray every week or every 2 weeks as required for white cabbage moth..they hate it..and I think it would be good soil conditioner as well if any drops on your soil.. It works for me...but gotta do it before white butterfly lays eggs...otherwise you might have to use the 2 finger method and squash grubs for your garden birds.. So there you have it, not necessarily straight from our mouths, but simply one more potential use we’ve discovered for molasses, with at least one testimonial for it’s effectiveness. As we said before, the use of molasses as an foliar spray, in addition to it’s potential use as a pest deterrent, would also serve to provide some essential nutrients directly to our plants, and would especially serve as an effective boost of Potassium for plants diagnosed with a deficiency in K. Healthy plants are more resistant to the threat of pests or disease, so molasses really is a multi-purpose organic pest deterrent. I did not Write this or research this and take no credit for the information supplied. Thought it was really interesting read and wanted to share it with you. If anyone has used molasses please share you expirience with us. All coments and additional information will be of great help Peace to the highest Lamsbread
  9. Twilight - Dutch Passion - Defoliation Twilight by Dutch Passion is a purple variety, the seed is fem. I've had these seeds sitting around for a whole year , so I thought about time I gave them ago. When i first sprouted the seeds the idea was to veg them under CFL and flower them under LED. Due to unseen circumstances money had to go elsewhere and the LED light did not get bought. In the mean time I was keeping the plants small, effectively "Bonsaing" them keeping them in small pots and defoliating them and fimming the tops. Defoliation is a technique where once the plants are 15cm tall you pluck the fan leaves and the resulting growth produces more bud sites. I eventually got bored of keeping them in my veg box and decided to grow them on and will flower them in the near future. I didn't really bother taking pictures of them when they were young, I had more pressing things to deal with. The Grow Spaces Veg Box Dimensions- 48cm width x 33cm depth x 80cm high Diamond mylar lined. Lights - 3 x 36Watt Ubrella CFL's, 6500K (Daylight specrtrum) Grow Cab This is a small wardrobe/cupboard (The same one I grew my Supercritical Auto's in). Dimensions - 45cm width x 48cm depth x 200cm high. Lined with Diamond mylar Veg Light - 70Watt HPS - 3 x 36Watt Umbrella CFL's, 6500K (Daylight Spectrum) - 1 x 25Watt CFL, 6500K (Daylight Spectrum) - 4 x 23Watt CFL's, 6500K (Daylight Spectrum) - 2 x 20Watt CFL's, 6500K (Daylight Spectrum) - Free hanging (not in the reflector) Flower Light - 70Watt HPS - 8 x 23Watt CFL's, 2700K (Warm white Spectrum) - Maybe some free hanging 23Watt CFL's, 2700K (Warm white Spectrum) Ventilation - Ruck 100mm Inlinefan in homemade accoustic box with fan speed controller - Homemade carbon filter - 100mm 12v intake fan - 200mm air moving fan Temp/Humidity - 1 x Hygrometer reading temp and humidity with max and min readings - 1 x Aquarium thermometer, for reading temp without opening cab Grow medium - 3 parts Miracle gro Organic (no added chemicals 100% organic) - 1 part Perlite - 1 part Clay pebbles - clay pebbles at the bottom for drainage Pot size - 40cm width x 40cm depth x 30cm high Nutrients - Biobizz-Biogrow - Biobizz-Biobloom - Blackstrap molasses - Maxicrop seaweed extract Other Items - Small watering can - syringe in mm to measure nutrients - HM digital TDS & Temp pen - PH-009(111) PH & Temp pen - Moisture & PH probe - Digital & segmental timers Peace Hunters Lams
  10. I love this video had me splitting my sides, hope you like it too. Peace Lams
  11. Main-Lining: Clone Tutorial by Nugbuckets - Compiled and edited by Nebula Haze in August 2013, copied and pasted from growweedeasy.com "Main-Lining"The act of training a marijuana plant to form a "hub" off a single node, creating a "manifold" for equal energy distribution from the roots to each cola. The result is an even canopy and bigger yields with little extra effort. Main-lining was originally developed for growing marijuana plants from seed, but has been adapted to be used with marijuana clones. Note: This article teaches how to use the "main-lining" technique on marijuana clones. This technique is slightly different when starting from seed. Read the complete article on Main-Lining here: (including starting from seed) http://growweedeasy.com/mainlining Notes by Nugbuckets: Main-Lining Marijuana Clones I have found with clones that building a proper manifold adds an average of 10-21 days onto the total vegetative cycle. I average about 14 days to main-line clones. The more you Main-Line, the more you will learn exactly when the plant is ready to be pruned and bonded. A grower must watch the plant very closely for her to tell you when she is ready to be pushed. Newbie growers don't really have this down yet, and it translates into added veg time. Also, clones take longer than growing from seed. Period. I highly recommend starting out with a marijuana plant from seed. They are genetically programmed to build a strong root mass out of the gate, (which is critical when it comes to how quickly the young plant will recover from main-lining / pruning / bonding) During early vegatative growth, a clone is a bit more tempermental than a seedling. Note: This article teaches how to use main-lining on marijuana clones. The technique is slightly different when starting from seed. Read the complete article on Main-Lining here (including starting from seed): http://growweedeasy.com/mainlining When main-lining clones, your goal is to create a central "hub" or manifold for your plant to distribute energy to each of the colas. Your Goal When Main-Lining Clones Main-lining with clones is not as neat as main-lining plants grown from seed. When using clones, your final main-lined trunk will look something like this. Main-lined hub of marijuana clone (this is what you're creating in this tutorial) Main-Lined hub of another marijuana clone (this clone was grown bigger, with 16 colas, so the hub is more "spread out") Step 1: Start With a Healthy Clone Any clone will work, but symmetry is key. You will get the best results using clones which were taken very early off the mother plant, when she is still growing in a symmetrical pattern. These clones are still growing symmetrically, and are perfect candidates for main-lining. These clones will likely need to be topped in order to be main-lined. If clones are taken from an older mother plant, they are more likely to display an non-symetrical growing pattern (the sets of leaves don't grow exactly opposite from each other). This makes it harder to main-line, because the central part of main-lining is allowing all colas to originate from a single node. In the picture below, notice how the clone is not symmetrical. The growth is slightly lopsided, and the branches do not start at the exact same place on the trunk. This is a common growth pattern among clones taken from older mothers. Click the pic for a close-up! (Click for closup) This is typical behavior for clones, and you will have to compensate for this difference as explained in the steps below. With clones, you have to look at it this way: when there is in an asymmetrical trunk, the top branch or "leader" will always be dominant over any of the node growth below it. So when main-lining clones, it is mostly a matter of swaying the dominance away from the main cola until one of the chosen lower leaders catches up to it in vigor and stem diameter. Fixing the asymmetry is done with a pretty radical pinch/bend/bond of the main. Look at all bonding, pinching, and pruning as a form of suppression, and use that to your advantage. How old and how tall should clones be when you start the main-lining process? It depends on how fast your clones are growing. I started on this clone at day 10, when she was about 7.5 inches tall (picture of plant above with ruler). It can be easy to get caught up with the details, but the most important thing to remember is that you are trying to fix an assymetrical axial branching pattern. You want to make things symmetrical again to equalize energy distribution. The age of the clone doesn't matter nearly as much as starting with a healthy clone that has a few sets of leaves. Then the idea is to manipulate the plant so two main branches come off the main trunk. These branches should be as close together and symmetrical as possible, and you can use pinching and other gentle manipulation to try to even things out if you notice that one sides seems to be dominant over the other. Here are the steps you need to follow. Step 2: Top Clone (If Needed - Details Below) Some nodes naturally grow with two main colas, like this clone right here. If that's the case, you can skip this step. Skip this step if your clone looks like this (already has two main colas/new growth tips) If you are starting with a clone that has grown out several nodes, like the one pictured below, you will need to choose which node you want to become your main hub. Just choose any node with two healthy branches/new growth tips on either side which are relatively close together. Then cut off everything above that growth (top the clone to your chosen node). Leave the fan leaves directly underneath your new node. You will be cutting these off later, but she needs to keep leaves for extra energy right now. Step 3: Correct Asymmetry in Your Clone with a Pinch/Bend (If Needed) Because clones often do not grow with good symmetry, you will need to fix any non-symmetry so you have a hub that distributes energy evenly to all the colas. If your clone is already growing with perfect symmetry, skip this step. Take a look at the picture below of a clone which does not have perfect symmetry in the two main colas. Before (not symmetrical) Notice how on the clone's meristem, the left side is higher up and bigger. This means that this side is currently dominant. This dominance must be suppressed to equalize the hub and get the benefits of main-lining. I use a light pinch and bend to equalize the two sides. Look at the first bend in the picture below; you may be able to see my fingernail marks from the pinch/bend. Try not to tear or damage the cambium layer (the layer of inner bark) or allow the stem to split. Learn more about proper bending in this article about supercropping. After (pinch/bend to correct non-symmetry) Any injury you create to a plant will take a bit of time to heal. The more you break or tear your plant, the longer it will take to heal and get back into the swing of things, but even if you make a mistake, you'll usually be okay as long as you tape up your plants (and split them as needed for big injuries) and give them some time to recover. You may also notice that that I left all the vegetation above the hub for now. A young clone like this needs all the energy she can get to continue building a substantial and healthy root system. Remember: Clones often have weaker root systems compared to similarly sized plants grown from seeds. Therefore when main-lining clones, you must take extra care to reduce stress and give that root system time to develop. Sneak peak: This is what the clone looks like after it's grown out after this step. Notice how the two branches are growing more evenly. That is the main point of the pinch/bend. In a few days, we will top or prune clone again for 4 total colas, and then clean up some of this extra vegetation once we can see she is growing vigorously. Step 4: Tie Down Your Mains (Keeping Bends At The Same Level on Both Sides) If your plant was damaged during any of the previous steps, or if you're worried she needs time to recover, you may want to wait a few days until your clone is growing out its two main colas. This is a matter of expertise. As a beginner, it's better to err on the side of waiting too long. If you have a lot of experience training/bending clones, then you may be more aggressive. If you're unsure, wait until you see that your clone is growing healthfully. At that point it's time to top or prune again. I gave this clone a few days to grow out her two main colas before I started this step. Just to give you an idea, this is what my clone looked like right before I tied her down. Before Notice how I left all her extra vegetation. I will be removing this extra growth later, but I leave it on for now to help power the growing root mass. Important: Tie Down Colas to Form 90 Degree Angle With Trunk & Keep Bends At The Same Level on Both Sides You will want to use some slight bending/training/bondage to spread out your colas so they leave the main trunk at a 90 degree angle. Make sure the bends are at the same level. This is very important! This picture of a different clone better shows off what I mean by trying to keep the bends at the same level: You can use a variety of methods, including gardening wire, coat hangers, almost anything to tie down your plants. Just avoid using anything too thin or sharp, like string, as it can cut into your plants. This type of training, where you tie down and manipulate the plant, is called LST (low stress training). Here's a close-up of one of the types of ties I use to hold the plants down. It's just bendy gardening wire. You can also see the two growth tips at the end which will become two new colas. Step 5: After Clone Has Recovered, Top or Prune To Produce 4 Colas (remove all growth tips except for 4 mains) The point of this step is to remove all the growth tips except for 4 chosen mains. I generally will do this 2-5 days after whatever training I've done until now. Sometimes your clone may need a little bit longer if she's growing slowly, if she had an injury, or if she didn't respond well to the training you've done so far. The most important thing is to make sure that the plant is still growing happy and healthy before topping or pruning for 4. Basically you want to make sure there are two main growing tips left at the end of each of your two main colas. You can either top the clone, or just choose two growth tips that are close together and remove all the other growth. Topping produces more symmetrical growth, but adds extra time. I will usually chose 4 mains and use a pinch/bend to correct asymmetry because I am on a fast schedule. Any way you produce 4 symmetrical mains will work. Don't prune unnecessary fan leaves yet! Just remove the growth tips besides your 4 mains. Make sure that each of your 4 main colas has a nice big fan leaf underneath to power the growth of those colas. Remove all growing tips except 2 symmetrical growth tips on each side. Remove extra fan leaves and vegetation below the main splits. This picture will show you the 4 mains, and where the main splits are located. Tie down your 4 new mains. Your clone should now look like this Notice how I've taken all 4 colas and tried to spread them out. In the best case scenario, you want to train this "hub" of your plant to have lots of right angles, while being as flat as possible, so all the colas will end up having lots of room between them to grow fat and get lots of light. Here's a closeup of the wire ties I used to hold the 4 new main colas down. I bent thick copper wire into a hook and just hooked it gently around the 4 colas of the plant. You can use just about anything to tie the cola down as long as it's thick enough and doesn't cut into the plant. (For example, don't use string). You can see lots of new growth tips already on each main. In a few days, you will choose 2 of these to become 2 new colas, when you prune for 8. Step 6: After Clone Has Recovered, Top or Prune Again For 8 Colas I generally wait about 2 days after the last step. You may need to wait a little longer if it seems like your plant is struggling. If she's growing fast and healthy for a day or two, then you know she's ready to be topped or pruned again. Here's what my clone looked like after being topped/pruned for 8: In the picture above, you can see I trimmed each of the main colas so it only has two remaining growth tips. Sometimes it's easier to top, and sometimes you have two tips that you can manipulate into two new colas. The most important thng is to have 8 growth tips remaining, 2 on each of your previous 4 colas. In this case, there were two suitable colas at the end of each main branch, and so I just needed to prune the growth below the two mains. When you can avoid topping the plant, it will save you a lot of time in the vegetative stage. However, when topping the plant, you tend to get more even growth without the need for a pinch/bend. It's up to you to decide exactly how you want to do it. It's normal for plant growth to slow down a bit after being pruned or topped for 8 colas. Step 7: Prune for 16, 32 Or More (If Desired) If you would like to top or prune again for a total of 16 colas (or one more time after that for 32), then just make sure you give the plant enough time to pick her stride back up before each additional pruning. This quick guide may help you decide: You're Pretty Much Done! Now You Just Watch The Plant And Use LST and Supercropping to Keep Her Short If Any Colas Start Getting Too Tall. All of your effort is worth it because you have built the perfect structure to power your plant's growth from now on. After this point, you pretty much just get to enjoy the fruits of your labor... Here's this same clone 8 days later, so you can see what she looks like after she starts hitting her stride again. At this point, this clone is 23 days from rooting. 8 Days Later - Clone is now 23 Days From Root People often ask how tall? She's just under 10" in height. Here's that same clone again 5 days later. I still haven't done anything but let her grow out. The main-lining is doing all the work for me to produce the desired growing pattern. Want more examples? I'll main-line a different clone, and run her under the sun so you can watch her growth from beginning to end. Let's go! Lets follow the life of this Ace clone through her early main-lining, then watch as she is bonded and pruned. The first pic shows a young clone plant that has been pruned to hold two asymmetrical nodes. She was then allowed to stretch for a week or so. I've learned that giving clones some extra time to stretch out makes a big difference in how fast she recovers from main-lining. First I cut away all the growth tips below the main nodes. You'll notice that I am less gentle with this clone than I was with the first one. I removed more vegetation at an earlier age. At this point I have a lot of experience main-lining clones and I know she can handle it because she was given extra time to stretch initially. Only remove this much vegetation if you know she's got a strong healthy root system. If not, it's better to leave extra fan leaves on for now. Now the bonding begins... Our girl is the one in the middle. Notice the bends are all at the same level. This is very important! She is then pruned for 4 mains, allowed to grow for a week or so Then the marijuana clone is pruned for 8 mains..... allowed to grow a bit, then all the mains are bonded to the pot She is re-potted into a 5 gal. bucket. Then the clone is pruned for 16. Here's what her main hub/manifold looks like at this point: A few days later... At this point there's very little I have to do. Once the 16 colas are more grown out, I may need to bend/tie down parts of the plant to spread them out. Other than that, I pretty much let the plant do her thing. The main-lining you've done so far will do the rest of the work for you as far as canopy management! Now you just tend to the plants and wait until harvest! Topping vs Pruning: Cloning Question Answered By Nugbuckets Question: What really peaked my interest with main-lining was the total plant growth through 1 node. Now I can see plants from seed would work great, but with clones, do you still find that there is a difference in growth between the 2 sides? I've got a couple of 2nd gen clones I'd like to mainline. #1 looks like a good candidate for this project, #2 has some nodal gap, will this one work?? #1 - top clone of plant grown from seed - less than a month since cutting I circled the node I was planning on building the hub off of #2 - Top clone of a different plant grown from seed - less than a month since cutting - this girl has already been topped just to slow down her speedy growth. Can I use the circled node even with this big space between nodes? I topped above the node above the circled one, would I be better off using the current top node or the one I originally circled above? Peace Lams
  12. QWET Extraction With Ethanol Quick Wash Ethanol, also know as QWET is one of the techniques commonly employed to extract oil from cannabis. Here is skunk pharm’s QWET formula to produce an absolute using a 3 minute quick wash. As most of our extracted oil goes into oral meds, we also decarboxylate ours. This process is based on the 252F curve shown in the attached graph. The first question is why use a quick wash technique to extract the resins, instead of long soaks to extract as much resin as possible, or just boiling the material in alcohol to get the greatest amount of extracted material? The answer to that is that because alcohol is a polar solvent that is soluble in water, the latter two techniques also extract the water solubles like chlorophyll and plant alkaloids, as well as the plant waxes and vegetable oil. Even quick wash does to a lesser degree, but the added steps that we include here minimize pickup even further and we take additional steps to remove the impurities that we do pick up. The first wash will usually extract 75 to 80%, leaving the balance for the second. The second extraction will be more sedative and less heady. If you use a hand microscope, you can easily see when the trichome heads are gone and the stalks look like wet fur. You can also use the material for other extraction methods after it has dried. I have subsequently used BHO after the first QWET wash that yielded 16% oil by weight, and got 5% more pristine oil, or about 21.6% total. A cured material QWET absolute is one of the most aromatic and tasty of the extraction methods and consistently gets high raves from the volunteer test panels, as well as the patients and students. Both from an efficacy, as well as a flavor standpoint. The first step in the process is to get as much water as possible out of the material. A fresh material QWET is possible, but this procedure is specifically for material that has been cured to about 15% water content, which is typical of cured material. 15% is a lot of water and the alcohol already has 5% in it, so unless we reduce the water content even further, we will be extracting a lot of water solubles. We dry our cured material even further by spreading it on a cookie sheet and baking it in a 200F oven until just frangible when rolled between the finger and thumb. If the material is prime bud, we break it up loosely by hand and extract from trim as is. We never, ever, use a blender or coffee grinder to reduce material, because it produces a lot of ultra fine powder that makes it through conventional filters. Next, while it is still warm, we seal the material in a jar, which we place in the freezer to tie up any remaining water as ice. We also put the 190 proof grain alcohol in the freezer. When they have both stabilized at about 0F, pour the alcohol into the jar of plant material, so that it is at least an inch above the material, and shake it gently a few times to make sure everything is wet. Place back in the freezer. Remove and gently shake twice more until the material has soaked for 3 minutes, and then dump it through a wire strainer to drain quickly. We set the strainer atop a fine mesh stainless French Chinoise strainer, or a stainless coffee filter can be used. Don’t press on the material to extract more, but just let it drain. Set the material aside to dry for a second extraction. We usually keep the two extractions separate, as they will have different properties, as does the third extraction using water. After refreezing, the second extraction is done like the first, but when it is drained this time, the material is returned to the jar, which is then refilled with water and set aside. Filter the extracted liquid. We use either a #1 lab filter with a vacuum assist, or a simple coffee filter to further filter the solution, depending on the quantity we are processing. Place that filtered liquid in a suitable container and set that container in an oil bath heated to 250F. We use bain marie and other stainless ware from a restaurant supply or a still, so as to recover the alcohol. Make sure that the container is sitting on something that suspends it up off the bottom of the oil pot. I throw four jar lids in the bottom of my electric fondue pot and use it for that purpose. Never trust the numbers on the dial and use a good thermometer to set temperatures. We use either a mercury lab thermometer, or a digital one. Good temperature control is key to the process. That means the device that you use to control the oil temperature must have a narrow dead band, so that the temperature control is stable. We paid about $60 for a Quisinart fondue pot that was designed to heat sensitive sauces like chocolate and has excellent control throughout its temperature range. We also have a couple of Revels, that are slightly larger and work well, plus cost only about $30, though they have a slightly larger dead band. Some fry cookers have sensitive enough controls, but many deep fryers designed to primarily run at 375F, lack control sensitivity and have large dead bands at 250F. Either boil or distill off the alcohol until the liquid is reduced to a pool of oil, with no large solvent bubbles. We suck it out of the container using a 60ml syringe, and then filter it to 0.2 microns using a PTFE syringe filter, but a coffee filter or a #1 lab filter may be used.. Place in a suitable container for return to the oil bath and this time cook it until there are not only no large alcohol bubbles, but the production of small CO2 bubbles along the edge dramatically slows down, even when stirred with a bamboo skewer. Since you have much less material, a smaller one may be used. At this point we put them in small stainless cups with their tare engraved on their sides or a Pyrex beaker. The smaller container reduces the surface area that will be coated with oil when we cook it down the last time and knowing the cups tare weight allows me to take it directly from the oil bath and place it on a scale after simply wiping the exterior. Since we know the tare, we then know the extracted weight, and exactly how much other ingredients to add. Once adding those ingredients, we place the cup back in the oil bath, where we stir it until well mixed and then decant into its final container. Since the added ingredients include things that lower the cannabis oils viscosity, very little is left as a film in that container. If we plan to use the oil as is, without adding any other ingredients, we extract it from the container using the syringe, or a pipette, so as to not leave a streak of material in the vessel. After we have extracted all that I can using a syringe or pipette, we wash the container and pipette out with hot alcohol, and save the wash for the next run. Nothing is wasted or left behind. In that vein, as a final step, and for a different product, we strain the water from the plant material, the same way we did the alcohol and cook it off exactly the same way. When the water is cooked off, we redissolve the remaining oleoresin in hot alcohol, and place it in the freezer for a couple of days, before filtering it. This time there will also be red waxy globs of insoluble material collected in the bottom of the jar. Cook off the alcohol, and it produces an oil that is more sedative that either of the first two extractions. Attached thumbnail(s) 6-30-13 For all of ya’ll living where 190 proof isn’t readily available, here are a couple sites that will ship most anywhere, East coasters check out, http://www.winechateau.com/ West coasters, try http://organicalcohol.com/store/ copied and pasted from http://skunkpharmresearch.com/qwet-extraction/ Peace Lams
  13. Over the years I have come across various free to down load cannabis magazines, I think it is about time i passed on these links , so we can all enjoy a free magazine to read I Smoke magazine - http://www.ismokemag...ome/issue-1/��I used the Direct PDF Download. 12 issues for download International Cannagraphic Magazine - https://www.icmag.co...MAG/index.php�� 3 issues for download Dolce Vita International - http://www.dolcevita....net/downloads/ 4 issues for download Medical Canabis Journal - http://www.medicalca...ue1_Digital.pdf 1st Issue to download Medical Cannabis Journal - http://www.medicalcannabisjournal.net/digital/MCJ_Issue2_finalproof_v3_03212011.pdf 2nd to download Treating Yourself - http://www.treatingy...-issues.php��34 issues for download Soft Secrets - http://www.cannabis....rets/issues��29 Issues for download Peace hunters Lams
  14. Main- Futter , was es ist und wie es zu tun " Main- Lining" Der Akt der Ausbildung eine Cannabis-Pflanze , ein "Hub" oder " Verteiler " aus einem einzigen Knoten zu bilden, ein Zentrum für gleiche Energieverteilung von den Wurzeln zu jeder Cola. Sehen Sie den Haupt gesäumten Marihuanapflanze bei der Ernte .... Nichts als riesige , dichte Knospen ! Hub : Ein Ort oder eine Sache , die die effektive Zentrum von einer Aktivität , Region oder Netzwerk bildet . Vielfältig: Ein Rohr oder Kammer Verzweigung in mehrere Öffnungen ", die Pipeline vielfältig " Das Ergebnis der HauptfutterMarihuana ist eine noch größere Erträge Baldachin und mit wenig zusätzlichen Aufwand . Nicht mehr larfy Popcorn Knospen Energie stehlen entfernt von den wichtigsten Cola ! Hier ein paar weitere Marihuana - HauptfutterBildern, so können Sie sehen, was ich meine, über die mühelos auch Baldachin. Main- Futter ist für steigende Erträge im Innen- und Außenbereich. Im Freien - Mehr Stealth- & Steuer Innenaufnahme - Einfache Flachdächerund größere Erträge mit den gleichen wachsen Lichter Forward von Nebula Haze : Nugbuckets ist ein talentierter Marihuana Bauer und Fotograf , der den Begriff " Hauptfutter" Vorreiterrolle , seine Technik für Marihuana Ausbildung zu beschreiben. Sie können den ursprünglichen Satz von Beiträgen über Hauptfutterin ihrer Gesamtheit hier auf Rollitup.org anzuzeigen. Sie wollen auch nicht , seine Nugbuckets 'Lab Thread, wo er bucht weitere Bilder und Informationen zu den wichtigsten Futter - Technik sowie Anbau von Marihuana in der organischen Boden verpassen. In den ursprünglichen Nugbuckets Hauptfutter- Fäden, müssen Sie durch Hunderte von Seiten blättern, um alle Informationen, die er großzügig gibt, für die wachsende Gemeinschaft setzen zugreifen. Ich habe seine Arbeit an HauptfutterMarihuana genommen und verdichtet sie in einem einfach zu bedienenden Single-Page- Artikel. Bitte beachten Sie, dass Nugbuckets ist der Eigentümer der ALLE seine Fotos ! Ich hoffe, Ihnen gefällt dieser Beitrag und ich ermutige Sie , um seine ursprüngliche Hauptfutter- Thread besuchen eigene Unterstützung Nugbuckets bieten und ließ ihn wissen, dass wir alle daran interessiert, künftig wachsenden Informationen und Bilder von ihm! Vorteile der Main- Futter Größere Erträge - Mit der exakt gleichen Setup Set It and Forget It - Nach der Grundausbildung während der Anfang des Lebens der Pflanze erfolgt, brauchen Sie nicht zu viel anderes zu tun , um die Vorteile von Hauptfutterbekommen Mühe Canopy Management - Colas neigen dazu, natürlich wachsen auf die gleiche Höhe Fatter Colas - Jede Cola wächst zu einer ähnlichen Größe und Gewicht, die Vereinfachung der Trocknung / Härtung Prozess und produziert Fett , auch Cola No More Larfy Knospen - Keine kleinen , grünen " Popcorn"- Knospen , um Energie von den wichtigsten Cola ablassen No More Unkontrollierbare Stretching - Weil Energie wird gleichmäßig auf alle verteilt Cola , reduziert die Hauptfutterdie unerwünschte "strecken" von nur einigen Cola , wenn die Pflanzen ersten Schalter mit der Blüte - diese Strecke führt häufig Höhe / Platzprobleme für den Innenzüchter Innenaufnahme - mehr aus Ihren Grow Lights - Holen größere Erträge aus den gleichen wachsen Lichter -und Setup- Im Freien - Erhöhte Kontrolle und Stealth - Gewinnen Sie eine größere Kontrolle über die Dimensionen der endgültigen Anlage (zur besseren Tarnung und verringert die Chance von Schimmel ) und erzeugen ein wünschenswerter und konsequente Endprodukt Hier ist ein Bild von Nugbuckets zeigt sich das Fett gleichmäßig geformt Cola von einem Werk mit dem Hauptfutter- Technik produzierte er (Klicken für Bild closup ) Main- Futter ist nur ein Konzept über builing eine Anlage aus einem einzigen Knoten . Sie müssen nicht alles perfekt zu bekommen , um große Früchte zu ernten. Viele Züchter haben Hauptfutterihren eigenen Weg , und immer noch die Belohnungen zu erhalten , solange sie bauen ihre Hub / Verteiler aus einem einzigen Knoten . Main- Futter ist eine unglaublich leistungsfähige Methode, um die vollständige Kontrolle über Ihre Pflanzen in kleinen Räumen zu gewinnen, und gibt Outdoor-Züchtern die Macht , um die Größe und Form ihrer Pflanzen für eine konsistente Erträge steuern auch . Eines der besten Dinge über Haupt - Futter ist, dass es ein Prozess, "front- loaded" . Die meiste Arbeit geschieht direkt am Anfang der Lebensdauer der Anlage , die in den ersten paar Wochen. Danach bekommen Sie meist auf den Rücken legen und die Vorteile . Set Up Your Hub / Manifold In der Frühe Vegetative Phase ( ein paar Wochen bei den meisten , wenn von Saatgut) Dann lehnen Sie sich zurück und lassen Pflanzen in diese effiziente Form natürlich wachsen Bonus: Das Hauptfutter- Technik angepasst werden, um Pflanzen, die in fast jedem Raum passen erzeugen Wie Sie wachsen aus jungen Pflanzen , zahlen lediglich die Aufmerksamkeit auf den Aufbau dicken Stämmen von einem einzigen Knoten am Stamm , ( Ziel für eine hohe VCSA - Kreis Kambium Oberfläche) gleichmäßig zu liefern Nährstoffe von den Wurzeln zu jedem Ihrer Cola . Das ist es. Es spielt keine Rolle, wie ein Züchter erreicht dies . Dieses Tutorial und alle Beispiele sollten Sie beginnen, und ich ermutige Sie , diese Technik an Ihre eigenen Setup und wachsende Stil. Die Theorie hinter Main- Futter Hinweis: "Hauptfutter" ist ein Name, der zuerst von Nugbuckets geprägt wurde . Nugbuckets sagt, er sei sicher, dass Haupt - Futter getan wurde, vor und es wahrscheinlich hat sogar einen Namen , aber er einfach von Natur nannten es Hauptfutter und der Name ist für die Landwirte auf der ganzen Welt stecken . Main- Futter ist eine Form der betrieblichen Ausbildung zu helfen, Cannabis-Pflanzen wachsen gleichmäßig , mit Cola nur Fett und keine kleinen " Popcorn"- Knospen, die viele Züchter einfach wegwerfen . Diese winzigen Knospen nehmen Energie von den großen Cola . Viele Züchter entscheiden, " Lollipop " ihre Pflanzen durch Wegschneiden alle geringeres Wachstum , aber Hauptfutternimmt lollipopping auf eine neue Ebene , mit besseren Ergebnissen und weniger Energie verschwendet . Was ist der Unterschied zwischen Plain Lollipopping und Main- Futter ? Mit Haupt - Innenfutter, erstellen Sie eine Anlage , wo jeder Cola ist genau die gleiche Anzahl von "Schritte" weg von den Wurzeln . Alle Cola stammen aus exakt den gleichen Teil des Marihuana- Pflanze , die natürlich bewirkt, dass jede Cola , um eine gleichmäßige Menge an Nährstoffen und Energie zu erhalten. Als Folge wachsen Pflanzen mit einer ebenen, flachen Baldachin, die die besten Erträge für Indoor-Grower mit wachsen Lichter produziert . Viele verschiedene Trainingsmethoden können verwendet werden, um eine noch Dach produzieren , aber Hauptfutterscheint eines der effektivsten Technik für KleinbauernMarihuana zu sein . Mit Haupt - Futter Marihuana-Pflanzen , ist das Ziel , einen " Hub " aus einer einzelnen Knoten aufbauen , die Schaffung eines vielfältigen für gleiche Energieverteilung von der Wurzelmasse auf die wachsenden Tops. Dieses Bild zeigt , was ich meine mit " Verteiler " wirklich gut ....... meine kleine V-8 ! Post- 649170 - 13810940302626_thumb.jpg post- 649170 - 13810940457726_thumb.jpg post- 649170 - 13810940633094_thumb.jpg post- 649170 - 13810940774506_thumb.jpg Kopiert und von nugbuckets von Grass origial Technik eingefügt Frieden Lams Wenn ein Gesetz ungerecht ist , ist ein Mann nicht nur Recht, sie zu missachten , ist er verpflichtet , dies zu tun - Thomas Jefferson
  15. Hi Hunters This thread is under construction! Just wanted to throw something up, as I keep putting it off, so many things to do. I will tidy this up tomorrow! Strains 1 x Sugar Gom - Grass-O-Matic 1 x Auto Bomb - Green House Seed Company 1 x Blue Mazzar - Dutch Passion 1 x Massive Midget - Heavy Weight Seeds Equipment & Other Sundries 2 x 185Wactual draw LED1 x 150W actual draw LED Rhino FilterVente accoustic temperature controlled fan upto 400m3 per hourHeated propagator12V intake fan17cm oscillating clip on, air movement fanBluelab Truncheon EC/TDS/PPM meterPH penHomemade Accoustic fan box1m silencerInsulated wallsRootit spongesDigital & mechanical timersSurge protected Extension gang for LED lightsThermometer & Humidty meterRoot growTM Mycorrhizal FungiMaxicrop - Seaweed – Plant growth stimulantBiobizz – Bio-Grow & Bio-Bloom & TopMax (fish mix & Bio-Heaven on order)Molasses - Black StrapBioBizz Lite Mix & Biobizz All MixPerliteHydroton –Clay pebblesDia Hydro - Diatomaceous Earth GranulesThe Cab Dimensions – H 200cm x L 106cm x W 53cmInsulated walls – Insulation for laminate floors usedUnder cab insulation – Lag jacket sections usedUnder cab waterproofed – Gutter repair rubberised compoundUnder cab additional insulation – Plastic coated ripstop radiator foilDoors additional insulation – Plastic coated ripstop radiator foilLight baffled intake fan – louvered vent cover – black pond filter media – cowled intake coverLight baffled doors – internal wooden baffle lip & E-profile rubber draft excluderLocks – 2 x mini bolts & 1 x star boltLED Lights Specifications 2 x Elitegrow Pro 200 (180W actual draw)11 Wavelengths inc IR & UVDiamond LensesBrigelux & Epistar diodes3W single chip diodes90o Lenses2 x 120mm cooling fansSwitchable modes – Vegetative/Flower/Full Spectrum11 Wavelengths of Color Output: 760nm, 740nm, 720nm, 660nm, 630nm, 615nm-480nm, 460nm, 440nm, 415nm, 380nmLED Quantity = 100Total power draw 185W (When using Full Spectrum)Dimensions – H 70mm x W 210mm x L 480mmTotal coverage 90cm x 105cm (Veg)Core coverage 75cm x 90cm (Flower) 1 x Vipar B2X3 (150W actual draw)5 wavelengths Blue(440nm/460nm), Red(630nm/660nm) & White(3000K)Secondary lenses80o LensesSwitchable modes 3 or 6 light modules on/off2x 120mm cooling fans Some pics, I appologise for the quality! I am no Photograoher. Peace Brothers Lams
  16. Here is a link to "Grow Journals for all Mediums" - http://forums.strainhunters.com/forum/15-grow-journals-for-all-mediums/ Just click the "Start New Topic" tab @ top right of the page & give it a title and away you go. Here is another useful link to our FAQ section of the forums, which will help with general posting of pictures etc - http://forums.strainhunters.com/forum/37-faq/ any questions with navigating the forums or posting that have not been covered in the FAQ's, then ask a member of the mod team , Dust or myself and we point you in the right direction. Dont forget som pics too as they are helpfull to assess and difficulties you may have with your plants, but most of all because we love a nice bit of weed porn Let me also welcome you to the forums, it nice to have you on board with us. Maybe you would like to tell us about yourself in the "intoduce yourself" section of the forums where we can give you a proper welcome and get to know some of our awesome members. link - http://forums.strainhunters.com/forum/37-faq/ This is a very friendly forum which always promotes and nice vibe to all brothers and sisters and is a place i like to call home on the interweb. If there is anything you need help with just make a post and someone will be sure to answer, help is never far away Make sure you have a good look round the forums there are many useful articles, tutorials and fantastic grows to read. Look forward to hearing & seeing more of your grow. Peace brother Lams
  17. Like Dust mentioned some pheno aren't fully auto, getting all ten with this pheno trait is highly unlikely but not impossible, abit like the lottery 14 million to one to win it but sometimes people do win it. It may be the case you lucked out with this pack of seeds and got the non auto pheno in all 10 seeds, but lilke Dust said the yeild should be good. Hopefully there is some work to stabilise this strain, so it becomes fully automatic. Will you post your grow in a journal as it will be interesring to follow this grow? Peace Lams
  18. Last day to enter lol & don't forget to vote
  19. I'm currently growing a Big Bang Auto and it has been under 24 hour light since day one and went into flower after about 3 weeks. It does seem strange that they not auto flowering , did you buy the seeds yourself or were you given them? There is also a non auto big bang. Like Jose says give as much info as you can, do you have original pakaging? Peace Lams
  20. Here a nice thread about Guano with some nice recipes for guano soil mixes http://forums.strainhunters.com/topic/3673-3-little-birds-guano-guide-the-scoop-on-poop/ Hope you enjoy Peace Lams
  21. yup don't like the taste either always brewed them in saucepan and then added a load of coffee and drink as quick as possible. These days I rarely do mushrooms and when I do I prefer to do small doses which give me some nice sparkley giggles, I no longer need to be tripping balls, but thats just me. Peace Lams
  22. Bysens Helios is a nice light and have seen some good results, They have also released thier ChloraBA COB light using intergrated LED chips, look nice but has a big price right now. Latest inovation by bysen is thier all white LED full spectrum light. Thier SP range look like HydrogrowLED X2 lights.They use good chips such as Bridgelux & Epiled & in the Helios Cree LED's. I imagine you are looking at the Helios by Bysen? This is a light I have considered buying. Budmaster have been around for quite some time they have changed thier name and were previously trading as "Greenlights LED". They have been a long time reseller of imported lights & have tested and tried various lights and refuse to sell anything that is wack.Thier latest Budmaster lights using thier Budmaster II light engine is thier own light. It look a great light and was another light I considered buying, price was more than the light I bought, if money wasn't a problem I would have bought one. I really like the E-shine GrowSun and I almost bought one before christmas 2013 but instead opted for a vipar B2X3 again it was a price difference. Again if money wasn't a problem I'd have one of these too. If you had to make me make a choice right now I'd get the E-shine GrowSun, this light has a lot of nice features, second choice would be the Budmaster and third would be the Helios/Bysen. Having said this read as much about each light as you can and look for grows on various forums by googling the name of the light and including the words "grow" or "harvest" in the search. Budmaster have some nice grow diaries, a great light, good company but not as well known as some other brands from the East. Honestly it is a hard choice, which ever light from these three choice will be a good choice, it deciding which one that will be difficult. You have done well narrowing down this selection of lights but the choice is yours to make. (I have been in this situation myself & unfortunatley my choice was make purely on the least expensive option). I hope this helps & I will be very interested to see which one you choose Peace brother Lams
  23. Just been taking pics. A bit of a delay due to being somewhat under the weather. Hopefully post tomorrow. Peace Lams
  24. Psilocybe Baeocystis along with Psilocybe Cyanescens & Psilocybe strictipes are stronger than Psilocybe cubensis. One of the benefits of Psilocybe Cubensis is it's ease of growth indoors and a relatively high strength. Psilocybe Semilanceata are not the weakeat Psilocybe and have a moderate strength. The Psilocybe Semilanceata whilst not a mushroom so suited to indor cultivation has the benefit of be readily available to pick in many parts of the world, is easily identifiable and once dried has a better longevity of active compounds compared to other Psilocybes. They are easily found and I can pick a kilo in a couple of hours (wet weight). They have a moderate strength, but take enough and a heroic dose is in your head. 30 dried liberty caps is approx = 1 Gram (this is not dosage info, just haow many you can expect in a gram) One thing I do really enjoy is going out to the fields and having a damn good picking session, not forgetting some smokes, muchies and a flask of tea or coffe. Hints for picking psilocybe semilanceata, go on a sunny day following a nice period of wet weather. Always have some nice water proof shoes or wellies, plasic bags over trainers in not good! Be prepared take a coat and hat it may rain or get chilly. Depending where you live they can be found late summer to late autumn. Heavier blooms will occur on years with warm wet summers , which allow for abundant mycilial growth, where one thread of mycillium touches another thread a fruiting body will appear. In a good year more mycillial growth occurs and so a heavier crop can be expected. Keep the sun to your back, this is especially usefull if they are still wet and have an olive/hazel colour & the grass is fairly long. The sun shining on the mushroom makes it easier to spot, if you walk towards the sun you are seeing the shade side of the mushroom and it blends into the shade of the grass like camoflarge. This method is especially useful during the later part of the day as the lower sun hits the sides of the mushroom. The first time I realised this, I was walking through a field late in the afternoon and couldn't see many mushrooms,I turned around and suddenly there they were illuminated like little lighthouses. If you are picking on very short grass ie grazed very short by hill sheep, then no worries where the sun is they will just appear like carpets, they also will dry alot quickers as the wind and sun will dry them out & appear almost golden in thier semi-dry state. Peace Lams
  25. Psilocybe semilanceata do not grow from cow shit but instead grow on decomposed grass, it is a popular misconception they grow on cow shit. They are often found on lawns and golf courses which have no animal dung on them. Having said this "Psilocybe coprophila" do grow on cow/sheep shit and are about half the strength of "psilocybe semilanceata" . Psiocybe coprophila lack the distictive nipple of the "psilocybe semilanceata" and you sould take care not to confuse them with the "Dung Roundhead/Stropharia Semiglobata" which also grows on cow shit & has a more yellowish cap and longer stalk. Psilocybe coprophila cap 0.5cm - 2.5cm, stalk 2.5cm - 4.0cm, cap colour - tan to pale reddish brown, gills pale grey darkening with age. Halcuinogenic _ Stropharia Semiglobata cap 1.0cm - 3.0cm, stalk 6.0cm - 10.0cm, cap colour yellowish, gills purplish brown. Not edible Toke is right they are also called "Liberty Caps" here in UK

About us

Strain Hunters is a series of documentaries aimed at informing the general public about the quest for the preservation of the cannabis plant in the form of particularly vulnerable landraces originating in the poorest areas of the planet.

Cannabis, one of the most ancient plants known to man, used in every civilisation all over the world for medicinal and recreational purposes, is facing a very real threat of extinction. One day these plants could be helpful in developing better medications for the sick and the suffering. We feel it is our duty to preserve as many cannabis landraces in our genetic database, and by breeding them into other well-studied medicinal strains for the sole purpose of scientific research.

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