FibreFlex

Good morning @ all

4 posts in this topic

hello,

 

Just newly joined, hope I can learn here a lot. Has already some videos and am curious.

I have a question: in the grow videos is always "n-pk-micro 1-2-1".
Could someone please explain this to me?
N-pk micro I have found this:
http://forums.strainhunters.com/topic/9559-n-pk-micro/
But what do the numbers "1-2-1" mean?
A special fertilizer?

And yet this - excuses my bad english, i am german..........so don´t twist your knickers...;)
 
thanks

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This link might help to begin to understand.

 

https://www.gardeningknowhow.com/garden-how-to/soil-fertilizers/fertilizer-numbers-npk.htm

 

However, because that author describes the use of fertilizers in units of pounds, one can easily deduce that he is suggesting fertilizer calculations for large fields of vegetables. 

 

We, on the other hand, are more comcerned with providing nutrients for individual plants or for batches of nutrient solutions in our hydroponics setups.  Therefore, we would normally make fertilizer calculations resulting in measurements in units of (grams per liter of water per volume of soil) or (ml of fluid-nutrients per liter of water).

 

So for our purposes, the N-P-K numbers are more useful to us to help us to judge the relative concentration of the N and P and K in the fertilizer product we are about to use.  The numbers do suggest ratios between the N-P-K components, and as well, the numbers also suggest their relative strength against the total weight of the fertilizer product.  1-3-1 and 10-30-10 have the same ratio of NPK components relative to each other, however when judged against the total weight of the package, one should understand that the 10-30-10 product is TEN times more concentrated than the 1-3-1 product, and must therefore be mixed using a calculation adjusted for that difference in concentration.

 

For the sake of your plants, do not take these calculations lightly.  Over-fertilizing can destroy your crop.  And once any destructive-fertilizer-concentration is applied, it cannot be removed, except by thorough flushing or by draining away your hydroponic reservoir and mixing a new batch.  Regardless your method of flushing away an over-concentration of fertilizer, even if the plant is able to recover, there is still lingering damage to the root-system which is a shock to the plant, usually resulting in less than optimum performance (such as, stunted or abnormal growth, leaf-burn, a weakened state in which pests or mold might overcome the plant, improper development of flowers and/or fruits).

 

Every manufacturer normally publishes some form of mixing-instructions or dosage-charts, sometimes printed right on the container or on the bag; other times, such information is available as a separate inclusion within the package or a separate booklet (as it is with Greenhouse powderfeeding products), or that information is found online.  These instructions or charts vary widely between manufacturers; their fertilizer products are produced using varyingly-different raw components and different formulation-processes, so their mixing and application instructions are very important.

 

A good rule of thumb:  When using a fertilizer for the first time, read and understand the manufacturer's instructions, but then mix that product at only half strength for the first use.  Observe the result on your plants and make carefully considered adjustments to the mixing ratio for subsequent feedings.

 

It's all about dialing-in YOUR procedures for YOUR selection of nutrients for YOUR grow.  It's always a learning process.

 

Have Fun!

 

 

 

 

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On 20.7.2017 at 3:49 AM, Cannabissapean said:

This link might help to begin to understand.

 

https://www.gardeningknowhow.com/garden-how-to/soil-fertilizers/fertilizer-numbers-npk.htm

 

However, because that author describes the use of fertilizers in units of pounds, one can easily deduce that he is suggesting fertilizer calculations for large fields of vegetables. 

 

We, on the other hand, are more comcerned with providing nutrients for individual plants or for batches of nutrient solutions in our hydroponics setups.  Therefore, we would normally make fertilizer calculations resulting in measurements in units of (grams per liter of water per volume of soil) or (ml of fluid-nutrients per liter of water).

 

So for our purposes, the N-P-K numbers are more useful to us to help us to judge the relative concentration of the N and P and K in the fertilizer product we are about to use.  The numbers do suggest ratios between the N-P-K components, and as well, the numbers also suggest their relative strength against the total weight of the fertilizer product.  1-3-1 and 10-30-10 have the same ratio of NPK components relative to each other, however when judged against the total weight of the package, one should understand that the 10-30-10 product is TEN times more concentrated than the 1-3-1 product, and must therefore be mixed using a calculation adjusted for that difference in concentration.

 

For the sake of your plants, do not take these calculations lightly.  Over-fertilizing can destroy your crop.  And once any destructive-fertilizer-concentration is applied, it cannot be removed, except by thorough flushing or by draining away your hydroponic reservoir and mixing a new batch.  Regardless your method of flushing away an over-concentration of fertilizer, even if the plant is able to recover, there is still lingering damage to the root-system which is a shock to the plant, usually resulting in less than optimum performance (such as, stunted or abnormal growth, leaf-burn, a weakened state in which pests or mold might overcome the plant, improper development of flowers and/or fruits).

 

Every manufacturer normally publishes some form of mixing-instructions or dosage-charts, sometimes printed right on the container or on the bag; other times, such information is available as a separate inclusion within the package or a separate booklet (as it is with Greenhouse powderfeeding products), or that information is found online.  These instructions or charts vary widely between manufacturers; their fertilizer products are produced using varyingly-different raw components and different formulation-processes, so their mixing and application instructions are very important.

 

A good rule of thumb:  When using a fertilizer for the first time, read and understand the manufacturer's instructions, but then mix that product at only half strength for the first use.  Observe the result on your plants and make carefully considered adjustments to the mixing ratio for subsequent feedings.

 

It's all about dialing-in YOUR procedures for YOUR selection of nutrients for YOUR grow.  It's always a learning process.

 

Have Fun!

 

 

 

 

yeah, thanks, that helps

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Strain Hunters is a series of documentaries aimed at informing the general public about the quest for the preservation of the cannabis plant in the form of particularly vulnerable landraces originating in the poorest areas of the planet.

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