Cannabissapean

Gear Review - Building a Greenhouse, a Vitavia "Zeus 2" #8100

50 posts in this topic

Saturday, the 10th...

Gable Bars and Ridge Bar

 

Installing the Ridge Bar definitely requires at least two persons.  After the Ridge Bar is in place, one can again work alone to install the Gable Bars.

 

I found it necessary to create a small "helping tool" when installing (and later adjusting) the Gable Bars.  The Problem is that the Gable Bars are at an angle, and when the lowest bolt in the groove is left unfastened and the Gable Bar is then lifted from the eave for any kind of adjustment, the bolt slides readily out of the Gable Bar and falls onto the ground or worse, falls into the inside of the profile of the Middle Bar located directly underneath the lifted Gable Bar.  The bolts are not easily shoved back upwards because they tend to hang in the groove.  I found this corrugated plastic to be the perfect solution.  I cut it to fit the dual-groove Middle Bar.  Using this helping tool enables one to insert bolts into the end, push them upwards beyond the eave angle, and hold it there until a nut can be installed to hold it in place.  With time I learned that I can only move one bolt at a time.  Here are some pictures of that helping tool.  Later I re-cut the tool to turn the grain of the plastic so that it would be stronger.  Approximate dimensions can also be seen.

By the way, this same kind of corrugated plastic is also useful for stealthy transport of beans...   ...using tips of Q-tips as stoppers...

 

OK, Ridge Bar and Gable Bars are in place...

 

 

 

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Next diagram:  Roof Middle Bars, Roof Vent Sills and Roof Braces

 

Voila...

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Next is Roof Vents and Roof Vent Glazing.

 

After fastening the frames together, the next step is to install the Glazing. 

 

How frustrating:  The manufacturer, after cutting the polycarbonate Panels, did not take care to blow the plastic sawdust out of the hollow channels.  Nor is there provided any means of closing-off the ends of the Panels to prevent dirt or bugs from entering.  Oh well, I didn't have any compressed air, so I blew it out with lung-power.    ...After the spinning stopped, I completed the Roof Vents.

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Glazing Plan

 

Roof Glazing and the approximate track of the sun.

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hi mate,

Great greenhouse, lots of work, nice structure and alot of information !

im follwing as well !

ganja xl

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nice greenhouse bro

i certainly agree with the extra fixings

better be safe than sorry well spotted

PEACE

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Tokage,

nooooo, it is not yet done.  :smoke:

 

I promise though, I will finish it.  I'm really stoked to have this Project.

 

The more I work on it, the more I am imagining the electrical Controllers that I want to build into it.

 

But gotta work, too.  And sometimes rain gets in the way.  My main Motivation, short-term, is to get it completely covered before freeze and snow, and to get it fastened down before any high winds come.

 

Thanks to you all for following.  I really appreciate that.

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More Progress last weekend:

Eaves Closures:

 

For the Eaves Closures, I was surprised that there were holes in only one of the pieces for each set.  For 16mm thick panels, one does not need to install the spacer, but to make up for the 6mm difference when installing 10 mm panels, the spacer needs to be assembled before installation in the eaves.

 

What I found disappointing was that the base eave closures were neither pre-bored nor pre-punched to indicate where the screw is to be installed.  This leaves room for error on the part of the installer, which did happen in my case.  At first, I drilled each base piece with 3 holes in the wrong location.  Luckily, after the correction, the false holes had no bearing on the air-tightness. 

 

To drill these holes properly requires some equipment (vice, bar-clamps and drill) and some competent basic mechanical skills on the part of the installer.  Here are some pictures of my set-up for match-drilling the holes.  The screws are 3mm thread-cutting screws, and a pre-drill of 2mm works fine.

 

The spacer bar must be attached to the base eave closure bar in such a way that the bars contact each other with 2 landings, maybe you can see in the photo.  Also, the bars are of different lengths, and care must be taken to ensure that they are exactly centered with each other, hence the need for the vice and bar-clamps to hold everything exactly in the proper place during the drilling process.

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Next, the Rain Gutters...

 

(Sorry, but apparently I cannot control the order in which the pictures appear in this post.)

 

The gutters fit into a groove when held at an angle, then they are lowered into place, and the grooves lock together.  Then bolts are installed in the lower edge of the gutter-plate to prevent the gutter from ever kicking upwards.

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Another disappointment occurs when one inspects the ends of the eaves after the eaves closures are installed.  For the 10mm installation, there results a hole to the left and right edge under each 10mm panel.  Each hole is approximately 6mm x 14mm.  These holes would, of course work against you if you were shooting for a more airtight construction.  But, if one was worried about excessive condensation on the inner panels or wished more air exchange, then the holes are just the thing.

 

After measuring the resulting dimensions, I determined that one could install a second panel (dimensions 1346mm x 713mm x 5 or 6 mm) into the gap below the 10mm panel where the 16mm panel would have rested.  In one edge-on photo, you can see how such a panel would help to fill the gap.  Another photo shows a sample panel (too small for the purpose) sitting under the 10mm panel.  Doing so might increase the insulation, but it would also reduce the amount of UV and other wavelengths reaching the plants, and having 2 panes in contact with each other might also result in unwanted condensation between the panes and possibly discoloration due to mold or algae. 

 

I decided not to install any additional self-made panes. 

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So it´s seem like you have a choice to make? More Uv or better insulation? Can it mold easy on the inside if you have condensation? and what about humidity?   


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Jaaaaaaaaaaaa, those are exactly the questions to be considered, but since I have never had a Growhouse before, and since I do not know the particular characteristics of this growhouse, I don't have the answers.  For the moment, the choice is already made.  I'll construct it as the instructions guide me (single layer), and I'll let it go as-is for a year or two to see how it works out.  I don't expect to be using it for winter crops as a single layer construction, but if I do try to grow winter crops, I expect that I must one day invest in the second layer Panels and invest my time and effort required to dismantle and re-build the Panels.  But not now.

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Very nice greenhouse man! Love to see german construction work ;) You know that the foundation will last longer than we all live probably

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Yes, that's the way I like to build - build stronger or better than the minimum standards.  

 

But, sometimes I do make a mistake.  Such as this:

 

I had to go out of town again, and I had hoped that the weather would hold-out mild as it had been so far.   I chose to wait til later to secure the house to the foundation.

Well, while I was away, bad weather did strike.

 

Luckily, the construction is so strong that it held together as far as I can tell, without twisting the aluminum pieces.  Even though where it stopped, it was a bit twisted, but after lifting it and shoving it back in place, there appears to be only minimal damages.  One plastic wall Panel had been blown completely out by the wind, but it did not blow away.  I found it against my home.  The Panel next to it was blown only part-way out of its proper place, but it did sustain a little damage at the bottom edge.  This Panel will need to be removed, the crimped area flattened-out, and re-installed.

 

There was also some minor damage to the aluminum covering of the foundation as can here be seen, but being that it is in the inside, and since I will later apply a Silicone to these areas, it should be no Problem.

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Today, I secured the Grow House to the foundation using three Lag screws, one in each middle mounting flange of the left, right and rear walls.

 

OK, now I am back where I left off a couple weeks ago.  But now it is snowing and collecting on the ground and on the  Growhouse, so I won't be working on it for a while.

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I found this interesting.  A family wraps a summer-home inside a greenhouse to stay warm in Stockholm.

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Just re-visiting my journal to make it easier to find.

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Strain Hunters is a series of documentaries aimed at informing the general public about the quest for the preservation of the cannabis plant in the form of particularly vulnerable landraces originating in the poorest areas of the planet.

Cannabis, one of the most ancient plants known to man, used in every civilisation all over the world for medicinal and recreational purposes, is facing a very real threat of extinction. One day these plants could be helpful in developing better medications for the sick and the suffering. We feel it is our duty to preserve as many cannabis landraces in our genetic database, and by breeding them into other well-studied medicinal strains for the sole purpose of scientific research.

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