TheGeneral05

New transplants

6 posts in this topic

Hi,

 

I have 3 plant that I'm trying to rescue. The were originally clumped together in a 0.5L pot for germination, and sort of forgotten.

 

I saw that at least one of the three was really struggling, and decided to transplant the all to their own container.

I'm using solo cups with following soil:

Organic compost bought from the nursery 20L worth

Mixed with 5L worm castings

I then added organic Seagro B2051 Fish Emulsion (5ml to 1L water) and mixed in extra water get a moist soil medium.

 

It has been a week now since the transplant, and I noticed the yellowing of the bottom fan leaves of the strongest of the 3 plants, as well as the smallest of the 3 plants not really gaining any height.

I have read that yellowing of the bottom leaves is due to nitrogen deficiency. I did not expect that with organic compost. If anyone has any advice I would appreciate it.

 

 

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Yea that looks like a deficiency. But if that was my compost and worm castings it would be burning the plant. I would double check that compost and maybe give a feeding of  balanced liquid nutrient.

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On 2/5/2019 at 0:59 PM, sliver1 said:

Yea that looks like a deficiency. But if that was my compost and worm castings it would be burning the plant. I would double check that compost and maybe give a feeding of  balanced liquid nutrient.

Hi Sliver1, thank you for the response. 

 

I have currently switched to water only, as I was afraid it might be due to nutrient lock(due to the molasses)?  I will add some liquid nutrients with the next watering. I'm thinking only using the seagro fish emulsion, upping the dilution to 10ml:1L water and giving each plant 50ml, finally only filtered water to soak through soil. The town I'm in is a bit limited with variety of plant food...

 

Best regards,

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sounds like a decent plan.
But first check if the soil is wet or too dense for proper aeration of the roots. And if the plants is even placed in a proper environment. It looks like it could use some more light and ventilation.

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Attenzione però perché può essere anche un sintomo di mancata assimilazione per un eccesso di un altro marconutriente, non è detto che il terreno sia carente di N

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Controlla anche bene la permiabiltá, attento ai ristagni

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