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Lopo Arpolla

What nutrients are best absorbed at various ph levels?

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I read an article online from a nutrient company about how different nutrients are best recieved by root systems at different levels of ph between 5.5 and 6.5.

 

I found it very interesting but the article didn't go into detail about it very much. I was wondering if anyone from the forum can provide a bit more information about this subject. I'm also curious on how this concept applies to soil ph. Thanks!

 

 

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11 hours ago, Lopo Arpolla said:

I read an article online from a nutrient company about how different nutrients are best recieved by root systems at different levels of ph between 5.5 and 6.5.

 

I found it very interesting but the article didn't go into detail about it very much. I was wondering if anyone from the forum can provide a bit more information about this subject. I'm also curious on how this concept applies to soil ph. Thanks!

 

 

 

I found this resource very handy for answering such questions: https://www.growweedeasy.com/ph

 

Happy Growing!

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11 minutes ago, ShaggyGrower said:

 

I found this resource very handy for answering such questions: https://www.growweedeasy.com/ph

 

Happy Growing!

Thanks for the response! I really appreciate the help. I'll dive right into this when I get home.

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I have read a bit about how the fungus in the soil selectivity adjusts pH to maintain a homeostatic environment; and, what I mean is, the pH can vary location to location in the soil while remaining perfect for plant growth. In other words - the fungus is negotiating with the plant to facilitate the most desirable transfer of nutrients at the appropriate time and with the proper pH the plant/electrochemical-transfer demands at that time. Perhaps I have not articulated this in the most expertly way but it is my understanding that this example is one of the foundations for belief in the living soil/no-till. Of course bio-accumulation/ageing of soil play a role. Hopefully this can aid to your search. 

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On 2/17/2019 at 4:42 PM, RedBarn said:

I have read a bit about how the fungus in the soil selectivity adjusts pH to maintain a homeostatic environment; and, what I mean is, the pH can vary location to location in the soil while remaining perfect for plant growth. In other words - the fungus is negotiating with the plant to facilitate the most desirable transfer of nutrients at the appropriate time and with the proper pH the plant/electrochemical-transfer demands at that time. Perhaps I have not articulated this in the most expertly way but it is my understanding that this example is one of the foundations for belief in the living soil/no-till. Of course bio-accumulation/ageing of soil play a role. Hopefully this can aid to your search. 

Thanks a lot for sharing this information. You shared something that I've never heard of before. I really appreciate it.

I've read and listened to a couple of articles and lectures about living soil but I've never heard about how fungi can have thay ability to adjust ph for better nutrient uptake. That's really something else. Wow.

 

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