owhee

Kumaoni Landrace x Jamaican Pearl Crossed Jan-June 2019

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I bought my landrace seeds from seedsman - Kumaoni-regular-seeds on the understanding they would be a cold-hardy, mould/mildew & bug resistant pure Sativa.

 

To my mind (at that time), these seeds would be ideal for growing in the North of Ireland 54.5977° N with maximum daylight hours of 17.15hrs and minimum 7.15hrs.

 

However, the seeds turned out to be original and had come from Uttarakhand, Northern India 30.0668° N with maximum daylight hours of 14.05hrs and minimum 10.11hrs.

 

My first seed breeding grow was carried out in a small tent and used a combination of natural light and a 300 watt LED. I used 18/6 lights for veg and a staggered light schedule of 1 week at 14/10, 1 week at 13/11, 6 weeks at 12/12 and 6 weeks at 10/12.

 

With the luck-of-the-Irish, the light schedule worked and I got a few hundred Kumaoni seeds along with hundreds of Kumaoni - Jamaican Pearl cross seeds.

 

IMG_20190425_145823

 

Male K in the foreground and JP fem in the background

 

IMG_20190425_145831

 

Male and female Kumaoni

 

IMG_20190429_155602

 

The pollen drop 27 April 2019

 

Subsequent KumaoniNI single plant indoor grow under lights produced satisfactory yields and smokes.

 

IMG_20190911_140542_hdr

 

In June/July, I tested both sets of seeds by germinating and planting 15 of each strain in my polytunnel under natural daylight only.

 

Explosive veg growth started almost immediately and continued until about the second week of September when the first signs of flowering started to show.

 

I knew that my experiment was going to fail.

 

IMG_20190822_153401_hdr

 

The original seeds were not acclimatised to the daylight hours and extreme climate conditions of winter in the North of Ireland.

 

By late November the plants had only managed to produce some scraggly buds and mildew/bud rot had set in, the whole lot had to be chucked.

 

October, September and November were bad months for me health-wise, and I let things slip.I did manage to cull the males from my polytunnel grow and just left them to grow. As expected, the buds never increased in size beyond pop-corn size and mildew set in during November. Overcast skies and high humidity coupled with cold temperatures proved too much for the KumoaniNI and JamkoNI.

 

IMG_20191205_135044_hdr

 

I started 2019 in very poor shape. No smokes and very little chance of growing anything worthwhile.

 

I start 2020 in much better shape. 3 months of smokes and a 4-week continuous harvest schedule along with hundreds of seeds.

 

I’m developing a cunning plan to beat the mildew and rot by crossing early hardy landrace Indica with my current plants.

 

Plan it, practice it, pucking do it…

 

Good luck

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Outline Research and Planning for 2020

 

Reality Check

 

KumoaniNI seeds are going to take a long time to acclimatise to my latitude and persistent overcast skies. I’ll keep the few hundred seeds from my breeding grow 2019, but I will no longer grow them.

 

My current Jamaican Pearl clones will grow out to harvest. I will stop cultivating/cloning this plant in 2020.

 

JamkoNI (Kumaoni - Jamaican Pearl cross seeds) is worth persevering with. Early Pearl is part of the genetics and JamkoNI has produced some big dense buds. I’m going to use this plant in 2020. I have a few hundred good quality seeds and will start new breeding grow with the aim of back-crossing the Sativa strain and generating a new cross with Ata Tundra.

 

<>Ata Tundra is a pure Indica F1 hybrid strain from Alaska, which exhibits fantastic hardiness and resistance to frosts due to its acclimatisation to local conditions. finishes in just 45 days [indoors] and before the end of September outdoors in the northern hemisphere in 6-8 weeks.<>

 

I’ve researched and nearly dismissed it. Hardly anyone has a good word for this strain but everyone agrees that Ata Tundra produces solid buds with a high THC level. Almost no one managed to get the quick flowering timeline.

 

Using Anchorage for the daylight times and 7th October for the harvest date, I back-tracked 56 days and got 19th August for the start of the flowering date.

 

On that day Anchorage will have 15.23hrs of daylight and that light level will trigger the flowering cycle.

 

The North of Ireland has 15.23hrs of daylight on the 8th August and an 8-week harvest date 3rd October.

 

I can work with that timeline.

 

Propagate and veg from mid-June.

Harvest 1st October

 

January to June, I’ll use my grow tents to experiment with breeding, cross-breeding and finish growing out the clones.

 

That’s my outline plan for 2020.

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Thanks for the all genetic info!

 

It is great to seceloppe some resistant strains but in greenhouse, the most difficult thing is to controll the temp, humidity, etc.

And if it is not under control, some pathogens come on the plants like mildiou, botrytis, oidium,... 

 

If you can make good aeration and controle the temp between night and day. You can control the pathogens fungi. That's the key in greenhouse 👊👌😉

 

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Strain Hunters is a series of documentaries aimed at informing the general public about the quest for the preservation of the cannabis plant in the form of particularly vulnerable landraces originating in the poorest areas of the planet.

Cannabis, one of the most ancient plants known to man, used in every civilisation all over the world for medicinal and recreational purposes, is facing a very real threat of extinction. One day these plants could be helpful in developing better medications for the sick and the suffering. We feel it is our duty to preserve as many cannabis landraces in our genetic database, and by breeding them into other well-studied medicinal strains for the sole purpose of scientific research.

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