lamsbread

Growing With Molasses

43 posts in this topic

Meridian is the brand I use.

It is sold at my local health food store.

Biobizz veg is mostly made of sugar beet molasses, I may have mentioned it earlier in the thread, but thought I'd mentionit again if I hadn't.

 

 

 

Any difference in effect to AN Carbo Load?

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hey firefighter :)

Meridian is black strap molasses - It contains glucose, sucrose & fuctose & minerals  - calcium ,magnesium & iron.

BioBizz is made from sugar beat molasesses and contains glucose, sucrose & fructose & minerals -  calcium & potassium.

 

I haven't use AN Carboload , AN are generally credited for making a good range of nutes.

CarboLoad is mainly Glucose & xylose

here is a link tothe  ingredient in AN products - http://www.advancednutrients.com/hydroponics/calc/Nutrient-Calculator-Raw-Ingredients-List.pdf

 

Glucose is a plant sugar (monosaccharide)

Fructose is fruit sugar (monosaccharide)

Xylose is wood sugar (monosaccharide)

sucrose is a double sugar from plants such as sugar cane and sugar beat (disaaccharide)

 

Here is an interesting read ;)

“Molasses and Plant Carbohydrates”
Sugars relating to plant functions for maximum economic production.
 copied & pasted from - Texas Plant & Soil Lab, Inc.


Environmental factors that affect when and how much sugar to use:
a. How much nitrate is in the soil, and plant sap (petiole test).
b. Soil moisture conditions.
c. Sunlight intensity.
d. Temperature.
e. Wind
f. Fruiting stage / load
g. Growth / vigor [shade lower leaves]

The right amount at the right time can improve fruiting and produce normal
plant growth with less attraction for disease and insects.

Needed for healthy plants - fruit production - plant development &
maturity.
Roots take nutrients from the soil and transport them up the stalk thru the
petiole (stem) to the leaves where the sunlight aids the production of
photosynthates (sugars are not the ONLY product of photosynthesis)
carbohydrates (C, H & O), principally glucose (C6H12O6) and then other sugars and photosynthates are formed.

Plant Sugars and other photosynthates are first translocated (boron is essential to the translocation) to a fruiting site. If fruit is not available, the sugars, along with excess nitrates, spur the rapid vegetative growth of the plant at the expense of creating fruiting bodies (first sink) for the storage of the sugars.

Once the proper balance of environmental factors (heat units, light intensity, soil moisture, nutrient balance, etc) are met, the fruiting buds form and then fruit formation gets the first crack at the sugar supply.

Any excess sugars are then translocated to the number two sink, (growing terminals,) to speed their growth. The left-over sugars, etc. then go to the number 3 sink, (the roots,) to aid their growth. Here the new root hairs take up nutrients to help continue the cycle of sugar and other photosynthate production, fruiting, growth of terminals and roots.

ADDED SUGARS CAN AID THE PLANT IN SEVERAL WAYS:
-
MOLASSES is probably the best outside source of many sugars, such as table sugar, corn syrup and several more complex sugars such as polysaccharides found in humus products.
- Sugar can be added to the soil in irrigation water, drip & pivot being the most effective.

In the soil it can:

- Feed microbes to stimulate the conversion of nitrates to the more efficient NH2 form of N to synthesize protein more directly by the plants.

- The roots can directly absorb some of the sugars into the sap stream to supplement the leaf supply to fruit where it is most needed, and ALSO directly feed the roots for continued productive growth.

- This ADDED sugar can also help initiate fruiting buds in a steady-slow
fashion while maintaining normal growth.

-EXCESSIVE amounts of ADDED SUGARS applied foliarly can shock the
plant resulting in shortened growth internodes, increased leaf maturity & initiation of excess fruiting sites. This can be a short term effect lasting only a few days.

Pollination, soil moisture, nutrient balance and sufficiency as well as adequate light for photosynthate production decide how much of the induced fruit can mature.

 

 

Peace

Lams

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hey firefighter :)

Meridian is black strap molasses - It contains glucose, sucrose & fuctose & minerals  - calcium ,magnesium & iron.

BioBizz is made from sugar beat molasesses and contains glucose, sucrose & fructose & minerals -  calcium & potassium.

 

I haven't use AN Carboload , AN are generally credited for making a good range of nutes.

CarboLoad is mainly Glucose & xylose

 

 

Carbo Load is like your Molasses I guess, but easy to obtain for me from my growshop but just too expensive.....well AN.... I use metrop and GH simple as nutes, baba....

It def. puts more resin up there, that is for sure and I guess some extra energy.

 

 

 

 

 

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some carb in bloom helps no doubt about it!

Different people use different carbs , some like honey, some molasses and of course there are the scientifically prepared  ones.

They all seem to work at the end of the day it is all just  different types of sugar.

The reason I use molasses is the one i buy is organic (I grow organic somakes sense) it is cheap and the health food store is nearer then the grow shop ;)

I will add that molasses has calcium and magnesium in it, I grow under LED and the full spectrum helps the plant take up and use the Calcium and magnesium, which leads to Cal/Mag defficiency.

Giving them molasses help keep that from happening , I do still find I need to addd some Cal/Mag if they are greedy.

peace man :)

Lams

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I will add that molasses has calcium and magnesium in it, I grow under LED and the full spectrum helps the plant take up and use the Calcium and magnesium, which leads to Cal/Mag defficiency.

Giving them molasses help keep that from happening , I do still find I need to addd some Cal/Mag if they are greedy.

 

 

 

 

 

Yeah, they are just looking happier when you give them carbs esp. in late flowering. It also prevents from giving them too much nutes in the end. They can not absorb the nutes but need some extra energy:carbs.

Thanks for your note about cal/ mag deficienncy and carbs. So I don't have to use extra Calgreen with unnecesary nitrogen in the end!

Skol

Firefighter

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Wow i just love reading through this topic , thanks to lams and the rest for all the awesome info. For me  its all about the soil and molasses is key to a good healthy soil.

I have always learnt that honey should never be used in a organic grow because of its good antifungal and antibacterial properties , with living soil its all about the microlife and honey would inhibit it . i can see honey being a good source for chemical grows.

Keep it coming :)

Cheers 

Reaf

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Great Infos Lams :)

I Grew some OutdoorGrows with molasses my Issue allways was that it changes the Smell of my Buds so i ouldent get friendly with it.

Thx for the Infos :)

Greez

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Great info buddy, thanks for sharing! 

 

I leave my personal opinion and experience with the use of molasses. 

 

I use it only in cultures with earth, after you wash roots, irrigation water and molasses (mixture of one tablespoon honey and water - sugar cane molasses). 

 

It's great to make sugars, although it is best efficiency activating bacterial life, the substrate. It is good for growth and flowering, although personally, I use only in flowering. 

 

 

Greetings!

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As you say Jose it is best for Flowering and in soil yes! I am an organic grower and use soil with microbial life in it and also use Mycorrhizae.

I don't use honey , whilst it is good carbs, it concerns me that the antibiotic propertie of honey are not so good for benefical bacteria. (just my way of thinking, I make no judgement here) ;)

Adding too much sugars/carbs can have an adverse affect on microbial life.

I don't add molassses in veg as I use BioBizz, Bio-Grow(veg) is made from cane mollases,so adding more is of no bennefit to the soil.

Greeting :D

Peace brother

Lams

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I watched a very good talk on AACT and they went into the role of molasses on the microbial life and they explained that if too much is added the microbes go into hyperdrive and can't support themselves anymore and die of which would cause a lot of hassles in the organic soil.

Cheers 

Reaf

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Hi Reaf :)

Can you provide a link to the video? This is a talk I would like to see. ;)

AACT what does this stand for? I google AACT and there were many different organisations with this acromnym.

I love your knowledge and techniques with organic composts and soils, anytime you want to post an article or provide links would be great & i'd be sure to check it out. ;)

Peace bro

Lams

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thanks lams

I live in a area in south africa that has 0 proper horticultural supplies so i have had to create my own. Its been an amazing journey so far and everyday the ladies surprise me in new ways.

AACT is Actively Aerated Compost Tea . For me AACT is the keystone to any good living soil 

Aerated Compost Tea 
 
Aerated compost tea is "brewed" with the help of pumps that oxygenate the mix, speeding up the extraction of nutrients from the compost. It takes far less time to finish --- usually the tea is ready in as little as 24 hours, according to the Oregon State University Extension Service . Supplemental nutrients, such as molasses, kelp, fish byproducts or humic acid, may be added to this brew as catalysts. Once aerated compost tea is ready, it should be applied within four to six hours for maximum potency and benefit .
 
How is it Made?
Compost tea is produced by steeping finished compost in water in order to extract beneficial microorganisms and compounds into solution. It uses fine bubble diffusion to supply aeration and mixing of the solution, a supplemental nutrient source (Compost Tea Catalyst) to feed the microorganisms, and a 24-hour brewing cycle to produce a biologically active, Aerated Compost Tea.
 
 
 
The right compost is critical! Compost is the source of organic matter and organisms for extraction, so quality is very important! The quality of the tea is only as good as the compost used to make it. Worm castings are often used alone or blended with compost because of their highly diverse microbial composition. Supplemental nutrients (Compost Tea Catalyst) are added at the beginning of the brewing process to the tank to encourage the growth and proliferation of diverse aerobic microorganisms that are beneficial to plant growth. Growing Solutions’ Compost Tea Catalyst™contains kelp, humic acids, rock powder and a blend of botanical ingredients formulated for optimal microbial growth and diversity.
 
 
Benefits of compost tea:
Compost tea is a good overall plant health booster. Remember—healthy plants are better able to resist pests and diseases! Compost tea is typically used:
• Provide nutrients for foliar or soil application
• As a microbial inoculant via soil application to help build soil microbial populations
 
 
How to use compost tea
It is best to plan ahead for maximum benefit from compost tea. Aerated compost tea should be used quickly, since it contains living organisms. Ideally, the tea will be used within 4-6 hours of decanting from the brewer. Keeping it cool, out of the sunlight and in an open-top container, can prolong the useful life of the tea. Periodic stirring or continued aeration will prolong its life even longer. Eventually, however, the organisms in the compost tea will consume all of the food and air available to them, causing their populations to rapidly decline. Any tea that is left over or “expired” can be added to the compost pile or to the soil. Compost tea can be applied to the soil or directly to the plant as a foliar spray. When it is used as a foliar application, it is best to strive for thorough leaf coverage using a fine mist. Foliar applications are best done early morning or pre-dusk to minimize the effects of UV rays. When used as a soil drench, compost tea should be applied so that it moves into the root zone. This can be accomplished by following the tea application with additional water. Use full strength or dilute1:1 (tea to water) for indoor houseplant and garden plants. Drenching a medium size plant requires about 2 cups of tea plus enough water to get the solution down to the roots. Compost tea can be diluted (up to 1:3 tea to water) to cover a larger area like a lawn. When applying to lawns, apply the tea either just before or just after watering. Apply once or twice a month throughout the growing season.
While it can contain some nutrients and micronutrients, compost tea should not be thought of as a fertilizer. A healthy, biologically diverse soil promotes more efficient nutrient cycling, which can eventually reduce the amount of fertilizer nutrients required. Compost tea should not be viewed as a fungicide or pesticide either. Research has not shown that compost teas can prevent foliar diseases through foliar sprays in a consistent fashion. Compost tea is more accurately described as a soil or foliar inoculant to be used in combination with other good organic gardening practices and inputs.
How to make a compost tea brewer for under R150 -  http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vjGZL...eature=related
 
Caution: 
Use only chemical-free equipment for compost tea storage or applications, e.g. watering cans or sprayers, because residues of fungicides or herbicides are harmful to the compost tea organisms. Similarly, if you are diluting your compost tea before using it, it is best to use water that has been de-chlorinated to maintain the microbial life. Simply storing water in open containers for several hours before diluting the tea will work, as the chlorine will naturally dissipate.

 

This guy knows his stuff , its a bit long winded but they is a goldmine of info in it

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Cheers

Reaf

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Lemongrass tea and molasses = tastes lovely think it would work, thinking of useing lemongrass tea from seedling but had nitrogen deffencie what would you use ,then I was thinking lemongrass tea and molasses during flowering what's people think

ORGANIC

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Hi guys, really interesting info, thank´s for sharing.

If you are interesting in using molasses you should check pure carbohydrates, specially if you are not doing an organic grow.

The powder carbs  dissolved instanly and got available for the plant right away, you do not need 2 or 3 days for the bacteria in the soil to decompose the molasses and

transform the sugar into carbs.

Plus, I saw many times begginer growers that uses molasses and overwater, so there is no much air in the grow medium and the mollasses start to rotten in the root system.

I used molasses in many occations in the past with really good results, but since I bumped with the powder carbs, I been use them with better results, for me.

Take care.

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I love and use moleasses

My plants really seem to love a good Guano and molasses compost tea

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