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oldemarine

Hawaii looking at the exporting Cannabis Market!

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Sounds nice in principle, but as it said in the article it is dependant on weather federal makes it legal.

I can't see that happening before hell freezes over.

So far many states have made medical cannabis available and two states are legalising it for recreational use,Colorado already has and Washingto will later in the year.

But federal laws still says no, and the DEA can and will, still flex the  federal laws muscles.

I do hower think, although it is a  slim  chance that the USA is more likely to legalise cannabis than let say the UK.

Thanks for the share Oldemarine and keeping us up to date with Hawiian news concerning our favorite plant.

Peace brother

Lams

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Aloha Lams, Hawai'i is a long way from Washington DC. Many people here on the Islands think it is a good idea to become a new nation. We could give the US Navy a lease for Pearl Harbor like Cuba does at Guantanamo Bay!

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Aloha Oldemarine :)

Now your talkin :D

That is definately a new idea to me, I do wonder how easy it would be escape the USA's grip and become an independant nation.

Are there moves to do this? Maybe like an Independance Party?

It would then mean you could get some seeds it it were legalized ;)

In the mean time I hope you have some good pakalolo braddah ;)

Keep us posted on any Hawiian news ,It is always an interesting read.

Peace Braddah

Lams

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Aloha Oldemarine :)

Now I must pick you up on your spelling ......xD

 

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eVOZnKR3Hrk       Aloha Lams, The black cider I use in my greenhouses is in expansion mode lately!    

 

I only mentioned it because it made me laugh, If I had any kind of cider after a few pints i'd be wobbling around my greenhouse lol. ( We have Fun! :P )

 

But seriously, I know you meant Cinder , great news it is working for you, any pictures?? It would be great to see your ladies. ;)

That was a nice film/news about the volcanoe, does it light up the sky all red?

 

Peace

Lams

 

 

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Aloha Lams, If you go to Volcano National Park you can get close enough to see the glow at night. I am about 30 km away so we are too far away for the light to travel that  distance. Did you see the new one bag hydroponic 16-4-17-4-1.5 JR Peters & Oasis just put on the market? It looks like a good base to start as a grow nutrient solution with a few additions for the generative stage of growth (more P,K, Ca & Mg) this could change the way people do hydroponics.

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Aloha Oldemarine,

Thanks for answering my volcano glowing question. ;)

Can you send a link, I did a quick google for it but didn't throw anything up.

It sure sounds interesting.

I am in Europe not sure it's got this far or will.

Peace

Lams

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Yeah like Lams i wonder how hard would it be for Hawaii to get out of US control, a lot of islands have been wanting to do this, actually pretty much all "big" islands attached to another i can think about lol, so if it was that easy i guess more would have succeed, but that being said it's been done before so why not it might be great for Hawaii it would have to be studied deeply :) Are there any projects going like lams asked?

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Thanks for the link Oldemarine, looks like good stuff.

So often we cannot get our hands on these nice things,as they are often exclusive to the USA market.

If you use it be sureto let us know how it is and maybe show us some results.

Peace brother

Lams

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Aloha Lams, Oasis is Worldwide.When I was living in The Netherlands in the 1990s we were able to get Oasis Rootcubes without any problems. This new 16-4-17-4-1.5 will make growing cheaper & and easier for the novice grower at a reduced cost.

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Yeah I checked out the root cubes too.

Well if it is worldwide, then this is good news. :)

I'll keep an eye out and see who is selling it.

Thank you for letting me know.

Peace

Lams

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Sounds nice in principle, but as it said in the article it is dependant on weather federal makes it legal.

I can't see that happening before hell freezes over.

So far many states have made medical cannabis available and two states are legalising it for recreational use,Colorado already has and Washingto will later in the year.

But federal laws still says no, and the DEA can and will, still flex the  federal laws muscles.

I do hower think, although it is a  slim  chance that the USA is more likely to legalise cannabis than let say the UK.

Thanks for the share Oldemarine and keeping us up to date with Hawiian news concerning our favorite plant.

Peace brother

Lams

http://www.bendbulletin.com/localstate/1742464-151/triumph-for-hemp#      Lams, look at the Farm Bill the USA Senate just passed today. Nine States will open up to hemp production trial programs.

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This is great news oldemarine, I thought I'd post the article here!

Thanks for sharing this with us :D

    Triumph for hemp

 

 

Published Feb 3 copied & pasted from http://www.bendbulletin.com/localstate/1742464-151/triumph-for-hemp#

• The federal government is getting ready to let farmers in Oregon and elsewhere grow cannabis legally — at least, the kind that can’t get people high

Hemp — marijuana’s non-intoxicating cousin that’s used to make everything from clothing to edible oil — could soon be cultivated in this state and nine others under the federal farm bill, which (among other things) would allow the establishment of pilot hemp-growing programs.

 

Hemp history

Hemp and marijuana are the same species, Cannabis sativa. But marijuana is cultivated to dramatically increase THC, a psychoactive chemical that exists only in trace amounts in hemp. (“Marijuana” refers to the flowering tops and leaves of cannabis varieties with high THC levels.) Hemp has historically been used for rope but has hundreds of other uses: clothing and mulch from the fiber; foods such as hemp milk and cooking oil from the seeds; and creams, soap and lotions. Even George Washington and Thomas Jefferson grew hemp, and Betsy Ross’ American flag was made of it (supposedly, at least).

But centuries later, the plant was swept up in anti-drug efforts, and growing it without a federal permit was banned by the 1970 Controlled Substances Act. The last Drug Enforcement Administration hemp permit was issued in 1999 for a tiny experimental plot far off the mainland, in Hawaii; that permit expired in 2003.

Hemp industry

Even though hemp hasn’t been grown in the U.S. for decades, the country is one of the fastest-growing hemp markets. In 2011, the U.S. imported $11.5 million worth of legal hemp products, way up from $1.4 million in 2000. Most of that growth was seen in hemp seed and hemp oil, which finds its way into granola bars and other products. The plant’s path to legitimacy in the U.S. could clear the way for American farmers to compete in an industry dominated by China and Canada. But Congress has to allow it first; current U.S. law says it’s legal to buy and sell hemp products in the country — but illegal to grow and cultivate the crop.

 

Path to legalization

Hemp has congressional allies on both sides. Democrats from cannabis-friendly states have pushed to legalize the plant’s cultivation, while some Republicans, including the Senate minority leader from Kentucky, see the fibrous plant as a profitable new crop.

It’s in the farm bill

The latest push for hemp legalization is tucked into the federal farm bill. After two years of feuding over farm subsidies and food stamps, the U.S. House voted last week to pass the five-year, $500 billion legislation that shifts some farm subsidies (corn, soy, etc. — not hemp) around and cuts millions annually from food stamps. The U.S. Senate could vote as early as today on the bill; with the surprisingly strong bipartisan vote in the House, chances are good the bill will pass the Senate.

If it becomes law ...

State agencies then must designate hemp-cultivation pilot projects for research purposes. Ten states, including Oregon, already allow the growing of hemp, though federal drug law has blocked actual cultivation in most. One state has a head start on the others: The agriculture department in Colorado (one of two states that recently legalized limited recreational use of marijuana) in January released licensing procedures for farmers interested in raising hemp; a few farmers didn’t wait for the state rules, though, and harvested small amounts last year — the nation’s first acknowledged hemp crop since the 1950s.

State pilot programs

The farm bill would allow state agriculture departments, colleges and universities to grow hemp for academic, research and marketing purposes in states that have voted to make cultivation legal. The states would have to design regulations for their pilot programs and then register and certify all growing sites.

In Oregon

In 2009, the Legislature passed a bill allowing the production, possession and sale of industrial hemp — pending a change in federal law. The state law empowers the Oregon Department of Agriculture to draft rules specifying hemp as an agricultural product subject to regulation. At this point, there’s no time frame to do so, but rules would likely cover fees, processing and testing to ensure plants are not in fact marijuana.

So, where does that leave weed?

It’s not clear whether legalization of hemp cultivation would suggest the federal government is ready to follow the 20 states that have already legalized medical marijuana, including Colorado and Washington state, which also allow marijuana’s recreational use. The president himself is inching toward pot acceptance, but Congress has shown little interest in legalization.

Law enforcement officials have long complained that marijuana and hemp look so much alike that they can be distinguished only by chemical analysis; some officials say people could easily grow marijuana and hide it under the guise of hemp. Still, legalizing hemp, even on a limited basis, would give new ammunition to the pro-marijuana crowd. But right now, both cannabis plants are classified as controlled substances, long prohibited by Congress.

So don’t get your hopes high on hemp just yet. This isn’t the farm bill that everyone wanted, and lawmakers are likely to tread carefully. But “beating these plants down and burning them and killing them” doesn’t make sense anymore, says Craig Lee, with the Kentucky Hemp Growers Cooperative Association. “We’re going to start the education process now. It’s become more legal. People will feel more free about it.”

Sources: The Associated Press, McClatchy Washington Bureau, Vote Hemp, Politico, Oregon Department of Agriculture webpage

Photos from The Associated Press and New York Times News Service David Wray / The Bulletin

 

Peace brother

Lams

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