bozick

Flowering outdoors start Q

10 posts in this topic

Dear all,

please advise, when to start adding the GH booster feeding - it says on 3rd-4th week of flowering (I live in European continental influenced climate with warm, dry summers)?
I'll be growing outdoors, the plant is 100% indica, it should be harvested in 3rd-4th week in September and flowering time is 55-60 days.
I'll be also using GH short flowering feeding, is that OK?

Please advise the correct formula - what time/day it is 3-4 week of flowering for my plant?

Thank you and kind regards.

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@bozick

Hello bozick i never use it if they say on the packet how to use it i think its right way to use it or chek the feeding shedule fort the short flowering plant sorry if its not wat you look for answer ✌

Screenshot_20180426-121707.png

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On ‎04‎/‎03‎/‎2017 at 10:50 AM, bozick said:

Dear all,

please advise, when to start adding the GH booster feeding - it says on 3rd-4th week of flowering (I live in European continental influenced climate with warm, dry summers)?
I'll be growing outdoors, the plant is 100% indica, it should be harvested in 3rd-4th week in September and flowering time is 55-60 days.
I'll be also using GH short flowering feeding, is that OK?

Please advise the correct formula - what time/day it is 3-4 week of flowering for my plant?

Thank you and kind regards.

 

Outdoor grow with a planned harvest for 3-4th week in September - this piqued my interest from a concern pov.  The most obvious issue I can see is that you're likely to have to deal with daylight lengths.

Cannabis transitions from Veg to Bloom when the day/night gets to 12/12.

 

If you want to harvest 3/4th week of September, then your plants are going to have to start flowering sometime in July.

 

Are the lengths of the day where the plants will be grown going to be ~12/12 in mid July.  I suspect not, hence why I think an outdoor grow with planned harvest mid/late September is going to give daylight (too long ) issues.

 

HTH

 

Happy Growing!

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G22 and ShaggyGrower thanks both for answering.

 

OK, so If I understand correctly, flowering time starts when the day is 12/12 ... and if they say 11 weeks of flowering time (in video of Hawaiian Snow), it's 11 weeks from the day 12/12 starts in your location? :mda:

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8 minutes ago, bozick said:

G22 and ShaggyGrower thanks both for answering.

 

OK, so If I understand correctly, flowering time starts when the day is 12/12 ... and if they say 11 weeks of flowering time (in video of Hawaiian Snow), it's 11 weeks from the day 12/12 starts in your location? :mda:

 

 

The plant(s) will start flowering when they sense it's coming to autumn.  This could be 12/12, 13/11, cold nights, etc.  Growers generally force plants to flower by switching the lights (indoor) to 12/12 as it give the plant a shock that there are less daylight hours.  So for sake of argument, yes we can say flowering time starts when the day is 12/12.

For an 11 week flowering period, some say flowering starts when you switch to 12/12, other say it starts when you see the first flowers (sometimes two weeks).  So depending on your preference to start counting, it might be 11 weeks or 13 weeks.

 

To find out how many hours of daylight/night there are in your location, I recommend this link: http://www.timebie.com/sun/

 

So for instance, if you lived in Bratislava, then you'll find that there are 12.02/11.58 hours/mins of daylight on 26th September.  This is likely when the plant will go into flower by itself. 

If you want it to have finished flowering by the 3rd/4th week of September, it needs to have been flipped to 12/12 11/13 weeks earlier.  Outside using the sun which you can't turn off, compared to inside where you can, may prove challenging :)

 

Happy Growing

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@bozick

Some people use littel greenhouse and cover theme with a big plastic to get 12/12when they want  you just need  fresh air inside 

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To a plant into flowering outside you need to be able to control or manipulate the photoperiod or amount of light the plant receives, you can do this by either covering the plant or if you have a shed or greenhouse where you can place the plant in the dark.

I have access to a shed in the back yard, so I can place them in the shed to manipulate the photoperiod, I have light proofed the shed as best I can, but there are still lots of light leaks, but despite this they are not an issue, it does not have to be absolutely lightproof and pitch black with no light leaks.

Although it goes dark at night there is still a whole heap of light pollution from the moon, stars and air craft buzzing about even in the country side, never mind street lighting in towns and cities, so don't worry about making sure there are no light leaks, as long as you struggle to see properly once it does go dark outside it will be OK.

I use this site https://www.timeanddate.com/sun/ to work out what the day length will be on the 21 August (summer solstice) in my location, which is usually about 14 and half hours, this is the date when the photoperiod or day length really starts to shorten.

So when I want to trick the plant/s into flowering I put them in the shed so their day is 14 and 1/2 hours, then by the 21 August I can just leave them outside until it goes dark and by then they have been in flower for at least a month to ensure they finish before the end of September.

You can see how I did this in my journal for last years outdoor grow here

Remember also the advice that Arjan and Franco provide in the test grow videos about the stated flowering time for each strain has a bit of wiggle room of a couple of weeks, the time the plant takes to finish depends entirely on your growing conditions, so if they say 9 to 11 weeks if you don't have optimum conditions it will take 11 weeks or maybe a couple of weeks longer.

Happy growing

Gasmeter

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@gasmeter

hello gasmeter is the summer solstice not the 21 of june when its the longest day and the 21 of december with the longest night ?

or is not same moment in every country?

 

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Hi g22, yes your right the summer solstice is 21 June

Basically I used the day light calculator to find out the length of the day on the 21st of August which was 14 1/2 hours, same this year then when I want to trick the plant into flowering I make sure it gets 14 1/2 hours light per day, so I can pop my beans in May veg through June so I can FIM it and it has time to grow all its nodes, then at the start of July I then make sure it only gets 14 1/2 hour day light per day.

By the time it has been in flower a month it is the begining of August at this point if you just leave it out until it is dark it is only half an hour extra light so it shouldn't stress the plant and it won't re veg, or you could continue to make sure the plant only gets 14 1/2 hours light until the real photoperiod matches yours.

At this point I leave them out until it goes dark then I lock them in the shed nice and safe, too many rassclatt thieves snorkling about round here.

Gasmeter

Likkle more

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