76 posts in this topic

21 hours ago, jsm said:

you need a hole lot of good,dark and climate space if you want to store every single plant  in a single box my friend ,and even then very hard to keep them good for a longer period i think ,all best wishes in making the decision  

Good point. Drying fresh plants in a large deep freezer is another method I am interested in.

21 hours ago, jsm said:

all those stupid politicians all over the world should have the see the video's of the strainhunters landrace and really listing to all the locals who are growing for over hundreds and hundreds of years ,and how the pharmaceutical world finally are ready to invest in the manny very good possibilities witch this plant can give us and help so many people around the world   , keep up the faith brother !!

If the people only knew what the plant can do for jobs in hemp plastics and fuel they might make new politicians for their nation. The world is controlled with evil power converting blood into money and that evil power uses money like a timepiece to hypnotize the people into looking away from the power.

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What will the children be like?

 

Mazar-i-Sharif, Photo 1, 2

White Widow, Photo 3, 4

 

 

Already I have seen a few plants with the pointed leaves of the White Widow and even some of the long super narrow leaves of some more Sativa White Widow phenos. Also some very serrated leaves of more indica dom White Widow and with a majority of them showing a nice blend of both traits with an overall nice injection of hybrid vigor from the landrace Mazar-i-Sharif

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8 hours ago, SmokeyfromOz said:

Hi Redbarn, the seedlings are looking great, yes i had pests on my plants tiny little black thrips. I also like green tea, and thats a good idea with the water, i use tap water, and times rain if i catch it in a bucket.

 

You have so many plants mate to watch 60 !  I think next time, i try better soils. I like the idea of benefitical plants, as this saves using pesticides. I use the paper towel method for germination.

that's just the problem with having manny plants in a small place ,creepers and pests can easily spread around at the start and later on in the growperiode the can pollinate each other also .if it is possible for you to get some "dislike" from aptus to spray them i will definitely do it ,totally bio based on spices and herbs witch  the most of the bugs don't like the smell of it ,its really cheap in use (even 20 grams of dry weed cost more ).so it's always beneficial for the yield at the end .enjoy my friends !! bigger fields are bigger problems , it's just the way it works i guess 

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On 4/6/2019 at 10:48 AM, jsm said:

aren't you afraid of making your soil to compact with the use of the volcanic rock dust ,over here i use lava stones (hydro beats) at the bottom of my pots ,loosely mixt  together with the first layer of soil it makes it easier for the roots to breathe .last year i have used for the first time batquano (plagron)  witch i soak(24 ours) at a certain mix ratio in ten liters of water before giving this solution  to my plants and even this solution compacted my soil to much according to myself ,so i won't be doing it this season any more  ,according to some off my friends and fellow farmers it would enhance the flavour of the smoke at the  end ,sadly it wasn't really working .

I am using about 1/4 handful of rock dust per 5 gallons. It slightly tints the water red by itself.

 

I do continue to hear the rocks at the bottom are excellent. I thought about making extra biochar to line the bottom of the hole for trapping draining water and nutrients but then again I have a lot of biochar in my mix and I will be using ollas to slow-release water in the holes.

 

Bat guano is real nice but I only have chicken guano available to me and that requires some pre-work since it is a hot compost and needs to be composted before use.

 

Even above building nutrient density in the soil I am concerned with building fungal activity. The more fungal activity in the soil the more the soil expands and more free the roots can move. Very smart and hard work produces very good luck at least. Every run we all wish we changed something but this experience gives better harvest the next year.

 

The Activated Aerated Compost Tea is the real deal. Most aquarium pumps are $5-$10 and plants will respond immediately.

 

I also saw you mention a spray for pests, the compost tea also solves this issue and you can use almost anything for the compost tea once you get a good idea of what can not be used. I studied Boogie Brew to understand how I can apply the concept for myself without using any money to produce my compost for each new batch.

 

From my research honey has as much as 2-3x the amount of chelates as Molasses so I use the honey and as far as honey killing bacteria I have quite a nice foam head which is good bacteria so in my experience the bad bacteria is what is kept away. Honey is quite perfect as long as it is not the radiated honey big farm sells and is natural.

 

The big thing is do all that you can and do not skip things and you and your friends will enjoy good times and good smoke. Have fun and share your experience and knowledge and we can all enjoy 

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13 hours ago, RedBarn said:

I am using about 1/4 handful of rock dust per 5 gallons. It slightly tints the water red by itself.

 

I do continue to hear the rocks at the bottom are excellent. I thought about making extra biochar to line the bottom of the hole for trapping draining water and nutrients but then again I have a lot of biochar in my mix and I will be using ollas to slow-release water in the holes.

 

Bat guano is real nice but I only have chicken guano available to me and that requires some pre-work since it is a hot compost and needs to be composted before use.

 

Even above building nutrient density in the soil I am concerned with building fungal activity. The more fungal activity in the soil the more the soil expands and more free the roots can move. Very smart and hard work produces very good luck at least. Every run we all wish we changed something but this experience gives better harvest the next year.

 

The Activated Aerated Compost Tea is the real deal. Most aquarium pumps are $5-$10 and plants will respond immediately.

 

I also saw you mention a spray for pests, the compost tea also solves this issue and you can use almost anything for the compost tea once you get a good idea of what can not be used. I studied Boogie Brew to understand how I can apply the concept for myself without using any money to produce my compost for each new batch.

 

From my research honey has as much as 2-3x the amount of chelates as Molasses so I use the honey and as far as honey killing bacteria I have quite a nice foam head which is good bacteria so in my experience the bad bacteria is what is kept away. Honey is quite perfect as long as it is not the radiated honey big farm sells and is natural.

 

The big thing is do all that you can and do not skip things and you and your friends will enjoy good times and good smoke. Have fun and share your experience and knowledge and we can all enjoy 

learning a bit more each and every grow that's true ,that's also the reason for me to grow the same strain  for over a couple years in a row and even this is now guarantee you will have the same result ,plus side is you always will learn  something new .i am in a lucky position to get my nutrients just a mouse click away . 

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Compost tea made with used green tea bags soaked in honey.

 

12 hours from start, 12 hours remaining before application

 

Do you think there is any beneficial bacteria in this 5 gallon bucket?

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Stem producing the smell of blush wine and race gas.

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hi there my friend ,how is your grow developing at the moment ?? hope you are doing fine over there 

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Thanks friend. Things are getting big. 0.5L cups in photo. Will have some photos from the wild soon.

 

Very healthy and vigorous. Stem smells are superb. Mazari and Colombian landrace traits shining through

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On 3-5-2019 at 6:26 PM, RedBarn said:

Thanks friend. Things are getting big. 0.5L cups in photo. Will have some photos from the wild soon.

 

Very healthy and vigorous. Stem smells are superb. Mazari and Colombian landrace traits shining through

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looking good my friend ,the need a bigger space soon i guess but looking really healthy nice green and good size leaves !!

 

can't wait to see the outdoor grow ,all the luck to ya !!   

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These went out to their holes. I see the Mazari, Colombian, and South Indian traits well. Check out the hardiness of that stem.

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nice job ,looking good 

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8 hours ago, jsm said:

nice job ,looking good 

It is so much fun @jsm

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On 7-5-2019 at 1:30 AM, RedBarn said:

It is so much fun @jsm

your right about that my friend ,nothing beats growing your one !!

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Sent these 13 to the wild. Heavy rains and clustering the early plants together created some yellowing in the lower leaves and is also responsible for the plants shooting up as they have. Some plants began flowering nice white pistils, and  again, due to their current setup, but moving outdoors they will more than likely correct to their usual photoperiod or otherwise veg and flower very long and all season.

 

Classic red stem of the Mazar-i-Sharif seen in some photos.

 

The image with the scissors in views shows a beautiful male on the far left to which there is also a standalone photo of this fine specimen. The image with two large leaves is also the fine male.Most specimens exhibiting sex are in fact female.which I was told, off-hand, is a usual occurrence for the first generation of a new crossbreed (high female ratio).

 

All fragrances are of exquisite cologne-like fragrances with some exhibiting cucumber mint, jasmine vine, one is extremely prominent hominee and peppercorn with vanilla, some chocolate mint, some gas/grapefruit, most of exotic aromas and colognes. Very vigorous, amazing stem structure

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On 23-5-2019 at 0:51 AM, RedBarn said:

Sent these 13 to the wild. Heavy rains and clustering the early plants together created some yellowing in the lower leaves and is also responsible for the plants shooting up as they have. Some plants began flowering nice white pistils, and  again, due to their current setup, but moving outdoors they will more than likely correct to their usual photoperiod or otherwise veg and flower very long and all season.

 

Classic red stem of the Mazar-i-Sharif seen in some photos.

 

The image with the scissors in views shows a beautiful male on the far left to which there is also a standalone photo of this fine specimen. The image with two large leaves is also the fine male.Most specimens exhibiting sex are in fact female.which I was told, off-hand, is a usual occurrence for the first generation of a new crossbreed (high female ratio).

 

All fragrances are of exquisite cologne-like fragrances with some exhibiting cucumber mint, jasmine vine, one is extremely prominent hominee and peppercorn with vanilla, some chocolate mint, some gas/grapefruit, most of exotic aromas and colognes. Very vigorous, amazing stem structure

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the will amaze you i think when the get a larger medium ,looking good :clapping:

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22 minutes ago, jsm said:

the will amaze you i think when the get a larger medium ,looking good :clapping:

Thank you @jsm I am really wanting them to amaze me. The medium they are now is, on a waterway in the mud, natural hydroponics.

 

My other spots the plants are about 0.75 meter tall, looking very happy and very healthy and robust, not growing too much up or out yet, but looking extremely sturdy, perhaps sending tap root down to prepare for expansion. And of course preparing for the heat coming in. One spot I went to compost tea for pests and feed and the bugs ate many leaves at the lower of 2 plants but touched nothing upper and left the rest of the plants alone and again they all look like they must be working on getting robust root system to begin real expansion, they are sticking up straight as an arrow and lush lush lush lush vibrant green

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These are really pretty, they will be beasts by the end of season. Looking forward to seeing them flower in the wild. Happy growing my friend

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11 hours ago, Chefblake420 said:

These are really pretty, they will be beasts by the end of season. Looking forward to seeing them flower in the wild. Happy growing my friend

Yeah man no plant more beautiful than the ganja aye, I love that excitement of the season and then at harvest I gotta wait another 6 months for that excitement again. Happy growing to you as well good friend

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Now soaking in the sunshine, another strain:Kerala landrace (AKA Kerala, Kerala Gold, Idukki Gold), first collected by The Real Seed Company.and sourced directly from Kerala District India and then reproduced through open pollination. Also one plant on the left is not looking good from poor drainage and will improve in the nature.

 

Companion plants shown below are oregano, thyme, mint, lavender, bay leaf, and a volunteer corn.

 

Do you like the Sativa leaves? How high do you think the high will go?

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After thinking more on drying, I am most likely going the route of what we see in the Strain Hunters Morocco documentary of bundling the sticks of buds and leaning against a wall to dry.

 

Every compost tea batch I make is different with certain basics. For example one time it is raw brown cane sugar. This last time it was raw coconut sugar. 

 

The last recipe was this, and the plants responded very well: Also, everything is in extreme moderation, very dilute, probably should be higher but less is more in my book.

 

Next batch I am adding some bentonite clay.

 

Pink Himalayan Salt

Volcanic Rock Dust

Pulverized Limestone/Slaked Lime

Vermicompost

Raw Coconut Sugar

Raw Honey

Maca Root Powder

Coconut Flour

Iodine, the edible kind, pure/colloidal/nascent/monoatomic iodine

Kelp powder

Lemon peel

Lime peel

Gypsum Powder

Coffee Grounds

Wild Sage plant

Bragg's Apple Cider Vinegar

Green Tea

  • Vitamineral Green powder, with the following ingredients: Nettle Leaf ◊∞ 
  • Carob Pod ◊∞
  • Alfalfa Leaf ◊∞
  • Horsetail Leaf ∞ 
  • Ginger Root ◊∞ 
  • Barley Grass ◊∞ 
  • Parsley Leaf ◊∞ 
  • Wheat Grass ◊∞ 
  • Basil Leaf ◊∞ 
  • Barley Grass Juice ◊∞
  • Oat Grass Juice ◊∞
  • Chickweed Leaf ∞ 
  • Dandelion Leaf ◊∞
  • Holy Basil Leaf ◊∞ 
  • Moringa Leaf ◊∞ 
  • Yacon Leaf ∞ 
  • Amla Berry ◊∞ 
  • Shilajit °∞
  • Spirulina ∞ 
  • Chlorella
  • Kelp ◊°∞ 
  • Dulse ◊°∞ 
  • Bladderwrack ◊°∞
  • Alaria °∞ 
  • Laver (Wild Atlantic Nori) °∞
  • Protease ∞ 
  • Alpha-Galactosidase ∞ 
  • Amylase ∞ 
  • Cellulase ∞ 
  • Lipase ∞ 
  • Bromelain ∞ 
  • Papain ∞
     

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Someone tell that guy that told me honey does not work that I started my Mazar-I-Sharif x White Widow by seed and it is the 13th of June and the plants are over 2m tall and have not started flowering yet.

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Mazar-I-Sharif x White Widow

:umnik:

The dominant pheno is Sweet Mint with a strong Corn Flower starting at the back of the nostril and then swiftly covering the palate and bringing with it a hominee, then hoppy, and finally peppercorn. The other pheno is dominant with race gas, then a sweet fruit of cherry and berry mandarin orange with a bit of mint on the finish. Some leaves showing metallic green. Do you like this cross so far? All of the traits of it's lineage are evident. A real joy for me.

 

:sorry:

I need to remove the cages so you will notice some bunching which is causing the leaves in that area to get hot and dry out from touching the metal.

 

:umnik:

The photos are taken with a Canon 60D in Manual mode in the RAW format (30mb+ per photo (thanks GHS)) with color mode set to Faithful at 3900 Kelvin. Photo edits performed in Darktable with only the exposure adjusted in order to brighten the image since I always capture images darker than normal (either narrow aperture or 1/3000, low ISO, etc) to avoid any white-outs.

 

:beach:

The shortest plant is full sun 16+ hours, much bushier from it's elevated light and heat levels.

 

:paladin:

In choosing my preferred spots with ideal starting-soil I look for two things: an abundance of thick grass and wild herbs. Some better elements are terrain and inaccessibility.

 

:heat:

The garden with pure sand has the tallest and healthiest plants requiring the least amount of water. Perhaps this sand is an outcropping with an underwater aquifer keeping the soil moist (at time of planting I was moving the sand and it was all moist with rushes of air seemingly coming out of pockets two feet down.). In testing many soils in many areas I am able to know in the future which micro-climate of my choosing is better and best for the herb.

 

:umnik:

There are some chunks of the leaves eaten (the same bite shape from different area. Most likely cicada or small bird) but as you see the plants are mostly looking perfect as the immune system of the plant is very strong from the compost tea applications and most likely, as a result, contain very high Brix levels which means whatever bug or animal eats the plant they quickly become discouraged to repeat, and, also, this exposed wound of the plant quickly alerts predator bugs to a potential meal nearby so even within our micro-climate we must be inspired to create what is called a crypto-climate which is a micro-climate within a micro-climate from preparing the soil with great energy and enthusiasm to achieve excellent results. Also companion plants become more important as the planting season ripens so plant early and do not worry or plant late and surround your plants with basil, mint, thyme or similar. The jug in the photo is 18.927 liters or 5 gallons for size comparison.

 

:training:

I can not stress enough the significance of Biochar in the soil and well amended compost tea, not only for watering and feeding, but also the very important and lesser discussed element of water retention, nutrient bioaccumulation, and a stable and increasing biomass of good bacteria in the soil. Pure water will wash away nutrients making your plant miss it's genetic potential and will not help to bioaccumulate nutrients which will result in the soil drying out faster or becoming less potent for our goal of more than excellent plants. The biochar captures the nutrients from the compost tea, and so does the soil, for much longer than ordinary soil (endless benefits to biochar) and this means I am watering with 1 gallon per plant every 10 days and they are exploding in growth (in 38'C days). Of course there is an element of perfect storm involved in choosing good soil but happy results will contain formidable truths which we should feel encouraged to share in order to spread the happiness.

 

:drinks:

Some last things - walking forever and ever to the garden creates new difficulties. Choose a spot that takes you 7 minutes to water from point of insertion to extraction. Use the landscape to tell you how to paint your plants into it's natural looking image. Prepare the soil in the day-time so you are able to track the sun more accurately and this allows you to place plants very close to others without receiving any or very little shade at all since we know more sun is good and like coffee some partial shade is a good thing too as well as a natural barrier from strong weather or even close encounters from large pests.

 

:sungum:

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Very important tip I must record:

 

When using composted manure for compost tea, mix with a 1:6 ratio of compost material:water. Kicking myself for not having done this all along. The plants instantly respond unlike any way before. Glowing.

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About us

Strain Hunters is a series of documentaries aimed at informing the general public about the quest for the preservation of the cannabis plant in the form of particularly vulnerable landraces originating in the poorest areas of the planet.

Cannabis, one of the most ancient plants known to man, used in every civilisation all over the world for medicinal and recreational purposes, is facing a very real threat of extinction. One day these plants could be helpful in developing better medications for the sick and the suffering. We feel it is our duty to preserve as many cannabis landraces in our genetic database, and by breeding them into other well-studied medicinal strains for the sole purpose of scientific research.

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