Guovsahas

The Church, Himalaya Gold, Big Bang & Blue Hash Outdoor Grow

13 posts in this topic

Exciting grow, awesome strains:drinks:

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I had to write my first post on textedit because there was some problems writing on safari however it works on all other browsers but nuff said about that so if anyone else is having problems writing posts just change browsers.

 

I'm a outdoor grower but I can't say I'm a veteran yet, I only have 10 years experience of growing outdoors most of which is in Scandinavia. I really like the Scandinavian countries BUT the weed laws in Sweden are terrible and the pot is even worse EXCEPT in Denmark. The reason I grow my own is so I don't support organized crime groups that are currently battling it out in various suburbs in Swedish cities for control of the drug market and I also grow my own so I can control the whole process of what goes on in the plant.

This became very important for me when I worked a couple of months at a grow store in Stockholm which was selling a lot of equipment to people that you wouldn't want to befriend and hangout with however every now and then there were old hippies and dudes that I got along with, I constantly got into arguments with my former boss because he was selling Rox Plant Enhancer to some of the shady big growers. Rox Plant Enhancer is carcinogenic so I tried to convert the shady guys to go organic but all they cared about was weight so I got even more determined on growing my own but eventually I quit working at that grow store and today and also that grow store has been shut down for money laundering and a bunch of other charges.

 

I have always been for organic horticulture especially when it comes to my pot, even my first indoor grow I tried the biobizz organic line but I still prefer making sure everything is in the soil rather than coming with additives and nutrients in various stages.

I was actually also reconsidering taking a course in tree climbing and treehouse building so that I could setup a platform at some treetops but it was a bit overkill however one day I think I want to try it out just for fun.

 

I really look forward for this season, I'm hoping it's going to be a good one. I've bought a rubber dinghy so I can get to some "islands" that I've spotted in a swamp/bog, I've grown in swamps before. It's a pain in the ass to prepare grow spots but it's surrounded by reeds and the swamp is so deep in that it requires a rubber dinghy to get to the "islands".

I've also got a spot near a turn of a highway that is close to another bog so it can only be reached if you take a long walk through a forest or stop at the highway, now the worst thing that could happen at the spot near the highway is that there is a car accident and emergency services come to the place while a strong wind happens to blow in their direction but it's highly unlikely, I've found moose droppings in the area so I'm mostly worried of running into a female moose with a calf.

Another spot I've been scouting is actually near a old grow spot but it's also surrounded by reeds and I've already placed some boards nearby so I can build a platform to keep the plants from the water.

 

All of the grow spots are near a water source in the middle of a nature reserve so the water is safe to use and there's a lot of natural springs in the area. The only thing I'm worried about if this is a season with heavy flooding, that would really force me to reconsider my current plan and do it near a highway I've grown before however it's further away from water so it's a bitch to carry water to the plants.

 

I'm hoping that my biochar in my soil will keep me from needing to water too often, last years heatwave was hot in Sweden with forest fires everywhere in the country however it was a great year for growing.

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Mate, that is great to hear you have so many options. Plant in all of those places and twice as many more so you will have the great success this year and no broken heart if one or two does not work.

 

I will be adding 1 OLLA holding 10 liters of water to my spots to keep from watering or maybe only one or two times all season that is all. Water plant and fill olla.If olla still full, and plant looking good, go home. The water seeps out very slowly and roots grab on to the surface like a hand holding a ball and this keeps all soil moist and plants big

olla5.jpeg

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olla1.jpeg

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I am making the OLLA my self, by creating clay with this guy's advice: http://www.practicalprimitive.com/skillofthemonth/processingclay.html

 

Making the pot without spinning, only pinching and curling like art class https://ceramicartsnetwork.org/daily/pottery-making-techniques/handbuilding-techniques/pinch-pot-technique-fundamental-way-make-beautiful-pitcher/

 

And firing the pottery in a kiln dug out of the earth https://www.motherearthnews.com/diy/firing-pottery-zmaz81jazraw

 

 

Leave your OLLA unglazed* so the water can seep through for the plants

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hey verry good idea for watering the plants , i used a 10 litres plastic bottle with some tiny holes   same way :)

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hello great way to water your plants. I will have to look up those strains.  I have 2 Greenhouse this current grow. True the weather is pretty unpredictable,  First week for me cloudy at times, so not the best

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I really like the idea of Ollas, thanks for sharing but the climate along the coast is wet and cooler. Last year was unusually hot for Sweden BUT it could mean that this year there's a lot more rain with risk of flooding. I'm looking at other methods to retain water in the soil, with the use of biochar and vermiculite so it drain however I might be putting a olla at the a drier spot. I think the number of plants I've chosen are enough, my pots are 40L hence why I need a rubber dinghy to move out all the soil amendments in the bog. It's also not really a bog in the sense like a marshland but its part of a lake that is more like a bog, one can get to the "islands" that way. I've had 70 plants a couple years back and it was a lot of work for a guerilla gardener, I carried out all the soil amendments which was like over 2 tons and I do train a lot so it's not a problem for me. I don't feel like doing that again instead I'm going for a couple of bigger plants so that's why 40L pots seemed reasonable without causing too much suspicion. I can keep most pests away like deer, moose etc but like I wrote earlier my biggest worry is humans who are out hiking or youth who are out drinking in the woods so I need to rely on natural barriers like rose bushes, nettles, bogs/marshes etc. I once put a couple of plants at the university one summer, nobody noticed them because it was in the middle of a rose bush that I had cleared out in the middle and I cut a path I could crawl to at night, there was a lot of people at the university BUT rose bush with its thorns kept people away. It was great, a friend of mine said that someone would notice the smell however even if it smelled nobody knew where the smell came from and the plants at the university was a great smoke they became nice and purple, almost black when the temperature dropped

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4 hours ago, Guovsahas said:

 I once put a couple of plants at the university one summer, nobody noticed them because it was in the middle of a rose bush that I had cleared out in the middle and I cut a path I could crawl to at night, there was a lot of people at the university BUT rose bush with its thorns kept people away. It was great, a friend of mine said that someone would notice the smell however even if it smelled nobody knew where the smell came from and the plants at the university was a great smoke they became nice and purple, almost black when the temperature dropped

You sir are a true scholar and gentleman. I salute you

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So it looks like I'm also in the competition, I chose the Sweet Valley Kush since it was short and great for guerilla growing but I can't change the name of the thread I'll have to start a separate one for the competition. I look forward for the Sweet Valley Kush because it becomes darker in the last weeks of its flowering cycle.

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I was just checking out ollas and I found a video of a swedish woman who made a ingenious system using gravity, this is a system I'm currently looking into at a dryer spot because I don't want to draw too much attention by watering too much, it's ingenious and low-tech but still unsure if it's applicable in a guerilla grow setting.

 

 

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Superb video find. The best use for olla, never visit for watering

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Strain Hunters is a series of documentaries aimed at informing the general public about the quest for the preservation of the cannabis plant in the form of particularly vulnerable landraces originating in the poorest areas of the planet.

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